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seen Nov 7 at 22:48

Oct
9
comment Is it a security risk to use an unknown web browser?
Web browsers usually don't ship dodgy certificates. But users are often carefree and import certificates without thinking - far more often than browsers containing crippled certificates.
Oct
9
comment Is it a security risk to use an unknown web browser?
@Gudradain if you trust your browser to to perfect job in sandboxing the application. In some cases it might be better to use OS-level restrictions (read e.g. BSD jails/Linux containers or grsecurity/SELinux/AppArmor/... on Linux), since that usually receives more attention during development.
Sep
25
comment Four-factor authentication
@Lohoris The terms are rather fuzzy to begin with - same goes for password, it is possession like anything else that can be copied - c.f. Rubber-hose cryptanalysis.
Sep
25
revised Is a monolithic kernel more secure than a microkernel for a small OS?
added 356 characters in body
Sep
25
comment Is a monolithic kernel more secure than a microkernel for a small OS?
@grawity there are OSes designed with security and safety in mind, but you usually don't see them on every corner (although they are working on many places where people don't even think about an OS being present).
Sep
18
comment Does Skype technology tap a user's machine to route other calls?
It's not just the 40kbaud you lost becoming a supernode. Since other clients were connecting to you, you could have easily got spammed with hundreds of TCP connection requests (cf. computerworld.co.nz/article/501476/…).
Sep
12
answered Does Skype technology tap a user's machine to route other calls?
Sep
11
answered Is a monolithic kernel more secure than a microkernel for a small OS?
Sep
10
comment Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
It really does, and - even if judged just by the machinery present in a HDD - it can be rather interesting. Data deduplication and sector remapping are just the proverbial tip of an iceberg. :)
Sep
8
comment Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
Does the updated answer explain the it a bit better for you?
Sep
8
revised Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
RAM data retention
Apr
5
awarded  Yearling
Oct
15
comment Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
@Gilles IMHO the question is rather blurry regarding what exactly needs to be done. The "encrypt then throw away the key" approach is quite generic and has to be adapted to a particular problem. The solution for user home I have offered is just an example - and the need for it is actually implicitly contained in the question.
Oct
13
revised Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
added 743 characters in body
Oct
13
awarded  Editor
Oct
13
revised Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
added 743 characters in body
Oct
13
awarded  Critic
Oct
13
answered Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
Oct
13
awarded  Commentator
Oct
12
comment Ensure data doesn't linger after being deleted
@NickODell before trying to reopen, some things are still a bit unclear to me: what confidential data in your setup is not in RAM, having /home, /tmp and /var mounted there. Usually there's not much more, apart from the system itself. Are you using SSD or old-fashioned spinning plate HDD?