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 Yearling
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Apr
23
comment What could a malicious website do if you don't update Adobe Flash?
"You might also consider installing a browser extension like NoScript which disables any flash content until you enable it manually by clicking on it.". - You don't need an extension for this, browsers have this built-in: support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/set-adobe-flash-click-play-firefox / support.google.com/chrome/answer/142064
Apr
12
comment How to stop/detect someone else registering a certificate for my domain
Bogus certificates can be detected using Certificate Transparency. For more info, see certificate-transparency.org
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Mar
26
answered How to find Use-After-Free vulnerbilities?
Jan
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
25
comment Why can't an n-bit hash be cracked by hashing every single n-bit plaintext?
@IlmariKaronen That ("any collision") is also a way to read the question. I was assuming that the OP wanted to construct a table and then look up a specific hash in that table, which would require trying half of the possibilities (2^63 for the example of the OP).
Oct
22
comment HSTS behaviour within incognito mode?
@SleepProggger Thanks for the info. I've confirmed that the HSTS state sharing logic changed in Firefox 34.
Oct
22
revised HSTS behaviour within incognito mode?
Confirmed that Firefox 34+ (up until at least 41) does not share HSTS state.
Oct
4
comment Unseen.is encryption claims revisited with their proprietary, patented “xAES” algorithm
Modern web browsers do offer access to a cryptographically secure random generator, crypto.getRandomValues (I'm not saying nor denying that they use this, but it is not impossible to get secure random numbers in JS, as your answer suggests). I'd also ask how their system performs when the servers hosting the JS library become compromised.
Oct
2
comment How to find a process that is sending HTTP HEAD requests
Chromium-based browsers attempts to resolve 3 random hosts to detect whether these are being intercepted. See mikewest.org/2012/02/…
Sep
25
comment Reverse engineering of hash functions
Do you have the binary file? If so, disassemble it.
Sep
15
awarded  Taxonomist
Sep
4
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
4
revised Are official browser add-ons really safe?
Add extra info about Safari extensions
Aug
29
comment How safe are Firefox addons from official mozilla.org site?
1. The blog posts you cite are from 5+ years ago. 2. One of the addons were found to be safe later, the alarm was a false positive (blog.mozilla.org/addons/2010/02/09/…). 3. The reports were about " experimental" addons. That are addons that have not been reviewed yet. These addons can only be installed after confirming the warning. So, AMO is quite safe. Especially when compared to other extension galleries.
Aug
26
comment Is CORS helping in anyway against Cross-Site Forgery?
By the way your answer is phrased, DNS rebinding sounds like a serious vulnerability that is highly relevant to CORS, and somehow relevant to CSRF. In order to carry out an attack that abuses origin whitelists, the attacker has to control one of those origins. DNS rebinding is not going to help over there. If the attacker controls the origin, then the only thing where DNS rebinding could be used is to steal cookies that were set after a CORS-enabled request with credentials via an attacker-controlled host name. That attack sounds a bit far-fetched. Did you have anything else in mind?
Aug
26
comment Is CORS helping in anyway against Cross-Site Forgery?
If you always reply with Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *, then the resource is already public, so DNS rebinding doesn't add any value. Could you give an example (requests & responses) where DNS rebinding and CORS together result in a security issue, which really requires both components in the attack?
Aug
26
comment Is CORS helping in anyway against Cross-Site Forgery?
What is the relevance of DNS rebinding in the context of CORS? If a DNS rebinding attack is successfully being carried out, then information is already being leaked (regardless of CORS headers). If CORS is incorrectly set up, then information can already be accessed without DNS rebinding. In either case, I don't understand why DNS rebinding deserved to be mentioned in your answer. Did I overlook anything?
Aug
6
comment Why do phishing emails have spelling and grammar mistakes?
I've read that sometimes these mistakes are added on purpose. Only a fool would fall for messages full of errors. And scammers are looking for that kind of people.