Reputation
26,369
Next tag badge:
100/100 score
17/20 answers
Badges
5 56 120
Impact
~1.9m people reached

4h
awarded  Good Question
12h
revised Why is 128bit AES considered very strong but 160bit SHA depreciated?
added 1575 characters in body
12h
answered Why is 128bit AES considered very strong but 160bit SHA depreciated?
16h
revised What is the problem with multiple encryption and how do you know if you have decrypted a cipher?
added 4 characters in body
16h
comment What is the problem with multiple encryption and how do you know if you have decrypted a cipher?
If two 128-bit keys (K1, K2) are used to encrypt a message like c=E(K1, E(K2, m)) then to brute force c to recover m, you would need to check all the possible combinations of the two keys with a space of (2^128) * (2^128) = 2^(256) possibilities. This is equivalent to brute-forcing a 256-bit key. (Note you said (2^128)^128 which is equal to 2^(128*128) = 2^16384 -- this mistake was originally brought up in another answer by a user named Joe.)
Apr
26
comment Why aren't ransomware deployers arrested?
@Cestarian - The described doesn't seem foolproof solution against Ransomware. If you accidentally execute malware on any of your machines connected to the NAS and your machine has write privileges to the NAS, then you can be screwed. A good backup policy does (e.g., a privileged account does daily version controlled backups that no one else can write to).
Apr
24
answered What is the Javascript trying to do/exploit?
Apr
20
comment Does MAC address filtering provide security?
I don't see how MAC address filtering reduces the attack surface. OP is clearly asking about wifi (see the wifi tag + wlan0 in example) when the machines being filtered out are directly talking to the router with MAC address filtering. The biggest problem with MAC address filtering in this scenario, is it's easy to find the allowed MAC addresses (by just listening as they are in the unencrypted header of each packet) and it's also easy to change your MAC address. IP address filtering is different, as its not easy for non-network admins to change their IP to allowed ones (at least with TCP).
Apr
19
comment Security risks of using MongoDB ID vs a counter in URL?
Where in the OPs question did they specify if they are using HTTP? I see them leaving the protocol off of the URL.
Apr
19
answered Security risks of using MongoDB ID vs a counter in URL?
Apr
18
awarded  password-management
Apr
18
answered How can I mitigate the risk of my wifi key being shared with strangers through apps?
Apr
18
revised Security implications of reusing unused One-Time Password
Specified One-time-password to avoid confusion with One-Time Pad
Apr
16
comment I anonymously submitted a security vulnerability, but it was not resolved. What now?
Laws are vague and if you can demonstrate you've accessed information. E.g., one US federal law (18 U.S. Code § 1030) says if you obtain information from a protected computert (US gov't computer; used by financial institution; used in interstate/foreign commerce) that exceeds your authorized access its a crime. ( law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/1030 ).
Apr
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
revised Does public wifi pose a security risk to existing logins?
added 883 characters in body
Apr
15
answered Does public wifi pose a security risk to existing logins?
Apr
11
revised Linux or Windows- the security issue
Trivial Capitalization Edits proposed earlier were done inconsistently.
Apr
11
revised Linux or Windows- the security issue
rolled back to a previous revision
Mar
26
revised If someone hacks my wi-fi password, what can they see and how?
added 209 characters in body