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A Professional Research Analyst


Mar
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
18
revised What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
added 496 characters in body
Aug
18
comment What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
@Joe, If they didn't steal your phone and the site uses a two-step verification also the cookies won't help him to login at all but it will tell them that he's the one who was attempting to login when he tries to access a different page on their site and use his own identity.
Aug
18
comment What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
@Joe Some sites use cookies for detection just the same as they use cookies for authentication. For instance if you've tried to login a couple of times some sites will give you a cookie for the number of login attempts. (Usually they're hashed). Also the cookies help the sites determine if you're a legit user who has accessed the site before. It really depends on the site as to how they do it specifically.
Aug
17
comment What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
@Rook I briefly touched on IP geolocation in the database section, but didn't go into it too much. I've added an example mentioning it.
Aug
17
revised What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
added 51 characters in body
Aug
17
revised What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
added 1438 characters in body
Aug
17
answered What techniques do web services use to identify password theft?
Aug
17
answered How to block some websites and torrent usage in a small office?
Jun
24
comment Why aren't infinite-depth wildcard certificates allowed?
@Manishearth are you saying if you register *.*.example.com that you can literally use that domain, but not as wildcards?
Jun
23
comment Why aren't infinite-depth wildcard certificates allowed?
security.stackexchange.com/questions/10538/…
Jun
22
answered Make online payments anonymously?
Jun
21
comment Can unencrypted email be read or altered while it is in transit?
Or an offloader.
Jun
20
comment Can a HTTPS connection be compromised because of a rogue DNS server
Auto-fill causes even worse habits. I've noticed an odd quirk in Firefox that it will store different passwords for the http:// and https:// versions of the same site (probably different IPs). Amazon for instance let's you browse in non-HTTPS mode, but when you go to purchase something you have to reauthenticate over HTTPS. I had at some time setup a completely different Amazon account that I was using for browsing because their usernames are not required to be unique. I found this one day on accident when I discovered my second wishlist (and browsing history).
Jun
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
17
awarded  Informed
Jun
14
revised Why is blog spam always written so badly?
added 335 characters in body
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
14
comment Protect an application that uses internet from packet sniffing
You can read some SSL with Wireshark. wiki.wireshark.org/SSL
Jun
14
answered User agent information from HTTPS flow