407 reputation
38
bio website careers.stackoverflow.com/…
location Halifax, MA
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 8 '13 at 21:05

I occasionally like to answer other peoples' questions, and when I solve a difficult problem, I like to share it with the world.


May
8
awarded  Yearling
Apr
25
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
20
awarded  Caucus
Jun
22
awarded  Yearling
May
22
awarded  Student
May
22
awarded  Scholar
May
22
comment In the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, how is the shared base key 'p' known and how are A and B, protected from Eve?
I think I understand now, thanks. This method on its own only protects against passive observers of the exchange, not active interceptors.
May
22
accepted In the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, how is the shared base key 'p' known and how are A and B, protected from Eve?
May
22
awarded  Supporter
May
22
comment In the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, how is the shared base key 'p' known and how are A and B, protected from Eve?
Aside: I've been self-conscious lately after reading some strong opinions on HN that no respectable programmer doesn't know how SSH works and how to use it. I only have ~4 years of industry experience working on windows-based 'helper' tools and simulation software and it never really came up. I have a undergrad with a couple security courses that touched on this, but I'm sure the particulars didn't make or break the exams. Am I really so incompetent without experience in this area?
May
22
asked In the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, how is the shared base key 'p' known and how are A and B, protected from Eve?
Jun
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
23
comment How does changing your password every 90 days increase security?
Haha, I think if my company were that strict, it would be a formula for 1: Never logging out, 2: Everyone having a convenient sticky with their current password stuck to their monitor. Super Secure!
Jun
23
comment How does changing your password every 90 days increase security?
As for the reuse of previous passwords - most systems allow minor variations (change suffixes or prefixes), but few systems that force a password change allow reuse of the last 10 or so passwords. (As Bill mentioned). Even then, these same systems often have other security measures, such as a lockout if more than 10 unsuccessful attempts are made. With the number of possible permutations that can be made to a known password to make it only slightly different, there's still a good chance of stopping a brute-forcer with the user's common password.
Jun
23
comment How does changing your password every 90 days increase security?
Most sites don't require you to change your password. No one is going to change their hotmail, gmail, facebook, myspace, etc. passwords just to match their work computer password. The password reuse is a result of laziness, and that same laziness is why after the first few changes, there's a high chance the password is one they uniquely use for that system.
Jun
22
awarded  Teacher
Jun
22
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
22
answered How does changing your password every 90 days increase security?
Jun
22
awarded  Autobiographer