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Jan
6
comment How many authentication factors are there?
"Somewhere you are" could also require being physically present in front of a given system.
Jan
6
comment Encrypt files on flash drive for easy decryption
+1 -- the OP is asking the wrong question. The real question is "How can I give files to my non-computer-savvy accountant?" The flash drive is a distraction.
Jan
5
comment With which algorithm I can prevent a brute force on a login?
@e-sushi: I agree with what Rory said, +1 if you update your answer. Also, when I said DoS the admin, I interpreted what the OP said about having the admin locked out of his account because someone tried to login using that account. OP also specified no captcha.
Jan
4
comment With which algorithm I can prevent a brute force on a login?
Sure, that would work (see my answer), you should mention that second layer in your answer. A naïve implementation of lockout as described in your answer could be used to DoS the admin.
Jan
4
answered With which algorithm I can prevent a brute force on a login?
Jan
4
comment With which algorithm I can prevent a brute force on a login?
The problem with this approach is that I can block your access to the system if I know your username. I don't even have to want to access your account, all I have to do is enter "password" three times and now you're blocked until tomorrow, at which point I can block you again (...or my crond can block you again).
Jan
4
comment Difference between vulnerabilities on windows/linux/mac for same program
+1, see also 64-bit-specific vulns, e.g. guninski.com/where_do_you_want_billg_to_go_today_4.html
Jan
2
comment Secure one-time-use credit cards
You'd probably get answers more focused on the money/consumer side on money.SE.
Jan
1
comment How to implement secure device identification in a for-pay wifi router to prevent usage fraud?
+1 for strong crypto. Anything else is just a hack.
Dec
30
revised Security while connecting to a mysql databse using pdo
formatting
Dec
28
comment Setting up a honeypot
@ryyst: Some ISPs may filter traffic so that ports 137-139 (and others) can't even reach you. I'd suggest running a "noisy" port scan on the ports you want to reach from a host on another network. Watch your logs when you run the scan -- if you don't see your scan, then the packets are probably getting filtered by your ISP. (Don't run a "stealth" scan -- these packets won't show up in your logs by design.)
Dec
27
answered How would you analyze an image to find out if there are scripts embedded in it?
Dec
27
revised Is Teredo in my router a back door?
spelling; embed image
Dec
26
answered How to exploit this SQL injection vulnerability?
Dec
26
revised static IV and random keys using aes-256-cbc
edited tags
Dec
26
comment Public wifi security protocols
@Jason: What you're talking about is called a man-in-the-middle ("MITM") attack. I'm not sure if IPsec is less vulnerable to MITM than SSL, but you might find it instructive to read about SSL in this question -- I think the answers by AviD and Tronic are instructive. For SSH, if an attacker pretends to be your VPS, you will get a message from your SSH client telling you that the attacker's key does not match your server's key -- i.e. you will be aware of the attack and you can drop the connection before sending any confidential data.
Dec
26
revised Does an established SSL connection mean a line is really secure?
typos
Dec
26
answered Public wifi security protocols
Dec
25
revised Public wifi security protocols
formatting and typos
Dec
23
revised Is strip_tags() horribly unsafe?
add link