3,154 reputation
1619
bio website blog.bstpierre.org
location United States
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Dec 19 '13 at 15:15

Hey


Dec
26
comment Public wifi security protocols
@Jason: What you're talking about is called a man-in-the-middle ("MITM") attack. I'm not sure if IPsec is less vulnerable to MITM than SSL, but you might find it instructive to read about SSL in this question -- I think the answers by AviD and Tronic are instructive. For SSH, if an attacker pretends to be your VPS, you will get a message from your SSH client telling you that the attacker's key does not match your server's key -- i.e. you will be aware of the attack and you can drop the connection before sending any confidential data.
Dec
26
revised Does an established ssl connection mean a line is really secure
typos
Dec
26
answered Public wifi security protocols
Dec
25
revised Public wifi security protocols
formatting and typos
Dec
23
revised Is strip_tags() horribly unsafe?
add link
Dec
22
asked Using “canaries” to detect intrusion?
Dec
22
awarded  Electorate
Dec
22
comment Why would the browser present the certificate for an unknown outside site?
And: don't click through the warning! You may see this the first time each day because the address for the site you are trying to visit is not in the DNS cache. Refresh the page until you get to the right place. (Unfortunately, since these kind of DNS services don't follow standards, your browser/resolver may cache the response (for 10 minutes) so you may need to restart your browser and/or wait until the bogus response's TTL expires.)
Dec
21
answered How can you become a competent web application security expert without breaking the law?
Dec
21
revised Strange STP traffic in my network, possible MitM attack?
spelling
Dec
21
comment Finding security consultant for doing in-depth code review?
In my experience in development (not focusing on security issues), code review is hands-down more efficient than testing. It seems longer, but when you find a a bug in a code review, it's generally a straight line to a fix versus debugging to find the problem based on a test failure. Review also tends to be more complete than testing, and finding+fixing bugs before the product leaves the building is literally 100x cheaper than after they've been found by a customer. Security bugs probably have an even bigger multiplier.
Dec
21
awarded  Enthusiast
Dec
20
answered rsa certificate authorities
Dec
20
revised Multibyte character exploits - PHP/MySQL
deleted 16 characters in body; edited tags
Dec
20
answered How can I check wifi activity?
Dec
20
answered How to see whether the pcap contains RTP traffic?
Dec
20
revised How can I keep my programmer collegues informed about security issues?
formatting
Dec
20
revised Why do we authenticate by prompting a user to enter both username and password? Does prompting the password only suffice?
fix typo
Dec
20
comment Are passwordless SSH logins more secure?
Possibly of interest: gnome-keyring ssh agent timeout -- make the keyring "forget" your password when the screensaver kicks on. You can also do ssh-add -t3600 to make ssh-agent drop your key after an hour.
Dec
19
comment Killing IP connections who “spam” with requests
@JeffFerland: I don't think so: the regex in the filter file will only match the URL(s) that you specify. So an innocent user requesting 200 images+scripts+css all at once won't be affected, just the malicious request for the same "content.html" 10 times in 30 seconds (or whatever N times in M seconds the OP wants to set as a bound). Just as long as the filter file doesn't specify a broad wildcard to match all the embedded content that an innocent user is going to pull on each page load.