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Jun
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comment Which cipher suites with AES cipher provide forward secrecy?
@HubertKario OK, now I get it! Sorry for the confusion :)
Jun
10
comment Which cipher suites with AES cipher provide forward secrecy?
@HubertKario You've got to be kidding me? security.stackexchange.com/questions/14731/what-is-ecdhe-rsa ?
Jun
5
comment Using digital signatures to identify users
That entirely depends on what you want the entity impersonating the client certificate to represent. On the server side, the certificate is tightly bound to the particular server it runs on, due to hostname validation and all. But the situation is more relaxed on the client. There are basically no real naming restrictions. So if you want multiple client devices to represent the same entity, that's entirely possible - just let them share the same key/certificate. If you need to able to distinguish each device, then you would issue a distinct certificate to each, but it's not mandatory.
Jun
5
comment Using digital signatures to identify users
@James: You would use mutually authenticated TLS, which still requires certificates/keys for both the client and server, as in your originally planned scheme. But with that provided, it will do all the (a)symmetric crypto for you and you can be sure that it's secure.
Jun
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answered Using digital signatures to identify users
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Nov
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revised Timing attacks on password hashes
fix typo