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25,383
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94/100 score
18/20 answers
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Newest
 Enlightened
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~714k people reached

20h
answered End-to-End (Point-to-Point?) Email encryption
22h
revised Difference between OpenSSL and keytool
edited body
22h
answered Difference between OpenSSL and keytool
1d
awarded  Enlightened
1d
comment CV to a Suspicious Professor
+1 this may or may not address what may or may not be a reasonable question but it's d***ed true and useful for anyone on this site to keep in mind.
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
reviewed Leave Open Http splitting attack via webgoat
1d
reviewed Leave Open How to break MAC address filtering?
1d
reviewed Close End to end encrypted calendar
1d
revised Spoof IP adress after a TCP handshake
Documented socketpair definition of TCP
1d
comment Spoof IP adress after a TCP handshake
@Stephane the TCP sequence number is required to order packets within a connection, but it is not part of what defines the session. Yes, you must guess the TCP sequence number in order to spoof a packet when the four session definition parameters are the same. But by itself it changes all the time, and is not part of what defines the session for either endpoint. (Put differently, mucking with the sequence number can create an invalid packet with otherwise valid session parameters, which is separate from OP's question about creating a valid session with an invalid IP address parameter.)
1d
answered Spoof IP adress after a TCP handshake
Aug
28
reviewed Leave Open Virtual phone number
Aug
28
reviewed Close How to secure server when the root password is changed
Aug
28
reviewed Close How should I tunnel arbitrary protocol traffic over HTTPS?
Aug
28
reviewed Close Are there any pen testing tools/methods for wpa2 networks that don't require using an adapter that supports monitor mode?
Aug
28
awarded  Great Answer
Aug
27
comment Can simply decompressing a JPEG image trigger an exploit?
@JDługosz, yes, that's a standardized description. Most CVEs and descriptions of security holes use a set of standard phrases like "[local|remote] attacker could potentially execute [arbitrary] [commands|code] [with [user|elevated] privileges]". The re-use of succinct keywords and phrases ("boilerplate") allows defenders to quickly assess risk - for example, the [local|remote] keyword is important in assessing risk. The phrasing used in the GDI+ announcement tells me the code runs with the privileges of the user opening the JPEG - in 2004-2006 Windows, often an Administrator!
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
27
comment Using Lynx on potentially malicious websites
Be aware that there's a good chance that the warning is due to the fact that you're going to an android mod site - some web filters categorically consider custom Android ROMs to be illegitimate / potentially malicious. Still a good question about Lynx in any case :)