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comment Steganography for BMP
Probably too broad, but steganography is usually accomplished by adjusting the low-order bit(s) in each byte. Depending on the data/operation used, this leaves patterns (sometimes visible in the image). It sounds like OpenPuff is assuming the data is encrypted before hiding (because good encryption results in near-random data, this makes discovering something was hidden much more difficult/impossible) - you need a tool that doesn't care about encryption. Did the prof tell you what the encoding was? I'd assume it results in ASCII text for a first go.
Apr
13
comment Heartbleed: hackers have already used the vulnerability?
...you seem to be missing a link to source of this report.
Apr
13
comment Alternative to ICANN?
So, you and I walk up to a third person, each of us with another guy with us and say, "This guy here is Jeff Bezos". And they're both bald, and promise drone delivery, etc. How does guy number 3 know which "Jeff" is the real one - or even if either is the "Amazon.com Jeff"? Why should person 3 listen to either of us? If 3 gives one of the Jeffs $10 and doesn't receive a book, what name/address does he give the police? How can 3 be confident that a new Jeff is the "correct" one?
Apr
11
comment How vulnerable is Windows 7 to brute force attacks?
...among other things, there's a delay so that you can't check "how many characters are correct" (ie, no early exits for performance). If you have physical access to the machine, I'd pull the drive and access the data with a separate OS installation (or just start from a Live CD or something). For a six character password, finding a colliding hash may be faster (although I don't know how Win7 stores password data in terms of salts, etc).
Mar
31
answered Windows DLL Injection
Mar
29
comment Should I worry about this UAC bypass exploit for Windows 7?
...except, isn't System32 one of the access-controlled directories? That is, they have to be authorized to put their DLL in that location, so it wouldn't matter anyways.
Mar
29
comment Windows DLL Injection
...because what's going on is that you're compromising your own system. If you read the Old/New Thing blog, the author calls it "being on the other side of an airtight hatchway". It's like asking what's preventing people from entering your house - all your friends would ask "yes, but you lock your doors, don't you?"; you can "break into" your own house trivially - you already have the key. Breaking into someone else's house is pretty difficult if, y'know, they never give you the key...
Mar
25
comment How to explain buffer overflow to a layman
The one problem I have with this explanation is that most people write left-to-right; that is, the Amount Owing column would be written after the Name column, so should show the expected amount ($1000). You'd probably be better off having the entry for Name write to the next row, so the current-row amount could be safely written (note that you wouldn't even need huge amounts here - the person could just be in the table twice).
Mar
22
comment How does the authentication in the new UK £1 coin work?
Even when there's only one mint producing coins (single building/facility/whatever), there's usually several machines, and probably one or more spare molds (in case one breaks). So losing the key is essentially a related problem to losing one of the molds...
Mar
20
comment What are the possible rules to identify password sharing- to prevent fraud
Nope, still not clear; do your users login with both an id (email, employee number, whatever) and a password? Or only a "password"? On password-only systems, generating new passwords is problematic (ie, you have to lock both accounts if a collision is detected). On systems with both (user-id and password), you're 1) essentially lengthening the secret key and 2) have additional info for tracking/etc. In the case of having both, it doesn't matter if 2 accounts share passwords...
Mar
16
comment Is it safe to recycle unshredded credit card receipts?
There's this famous case, where the last four was part of the attack used to erase somebody's digital possessions.
Mar
16
comment Is it safe to rely on UUIDs for privacy?
Guess? Probably depends on how the UUIDs are being generated. Note that if they're trying for a specific file (or from a specific user), they're probably out of luck, but they can probably get a random one eventually. I'd imagine Amazon already has something setup for security - what does their service provide/documentation suggest?
Mar
15
comment Finding Hidden Keylogger Through Forcing a Computation Error
Note that pressing keys too fast might cause the keyboard to have problems, nevermind anything on the actual computer. They do have limited buffer space after all. You might be able to get useful results in a laboratory setting, but this'll never be practical; you need too much special equipment: high-speed camera, high-speed synchronized keyboard presser/emulator, environmentally controlled room, a known good baseline of the programs on the machine (probably, in an n! combination...).
Feb
24
comment Retrieve files from possibly infected USB
@Matthew - Viruses can hide in plain text files and jpegs, too. Under those situations, they require a poorly written program to read them (often, the dangerous file must be tailored to compromise a specific program or framework). Such a file may be obvious, depending on what other programs you use to look at it; image files have the EXIF section (metadata like camera model, timestamp of shot, etc), which isn't usually displayed with the image.
Feb
24
comment Retrieve files from possibly infected USB
If the virus can copy itself from a flash drive to a hard drive, what makes you think it couldn't copy itself to another flash drive too? Note that text files and jpegs can harbor viruses - the payload is then delivered when a poorly-written (and over-authorized, usually) program reads them.
Feb
9
comment How to prevent malware to know when removable devices are plugged in
@Black-Hole - Unfortunately, that requires that whatever you're covering the patient with not already be on fire. If a computer system is subverted, it's best to consider anything and everything suspect - that is, you can't restrict access to the notifications (reliably, if at all even normally). Essentially, your nursing staff is going to a closet for fire blankets, but isn't checking to see if they're on fire (or even just heated to human flash-point temperature) first.
Jan
5
comment IP cameras or webcams and wifi/network security
Any decent router/firewall should be able to stop outbound requests from a given ip/host; just deny the camera permission. I'm assuming that the camera doesn't store footage on itself (or not much) - stick it into a restricted server on the Linux box and you're set. However, unless the camera is able to "speak" WPA2 (or better), it's essentially broadcasting in the clear, and attackers won't even have to connect to your network to view it... or possibly swap out footage (new take on replaying footage, I guess - just repeat packets!).
Jan
5
comment IP cameras or webcams and wifi/network security
The camera will need to be able to "speak" WPA2 security, or the packets can just be pulled off the air (ie, it's essentially broadcasting them in the clear), regardless of whatever the rest of the network is doing.
Nov
18
comment What are the security implications of a device like Coin?
Even if it eventually dies, the next 4 years (or call it two) could still be fairly profitable for the manufacturers. How many people replace their cell-phones every two years (the common length of a contract/purchase plan).
Jul
13
awarded  Yearling