839 reputation
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bio website boardspace.net
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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 11 hours ago

I develop games for fun.


Jan
9
comment Someone faxed me a bunch of black paper
Given ubiquitous caller id spoofing, the number printed across the top, if any, is legally meaningless. Ask the NSA who called you.
Dec
17
answered Protecting sensitive content in JS source code and Ajax cals
Oct
31
answered Is there a hash algorithm that can identify similar files or strings?
Oct
21
answered How can these spam emails be accessing email accounts on respected domains?
Oct
21
comment Why are security-crucial software written in unsafe languages?
@everyone I agree completely that C/C++ is less safe than almost any alternative, but the question was cast as safe verses unsafe. Nothing is safe.
Oct
21
answered SQL injection with “INSERT” statement
Oct
19
comment Why are security-crucial software written in unsafe languages?
There are no safe languages. C/C++ may be less safe, but it's only a relative difference, not a qualitative one. Software vulnerabilities come from bad design and flawed implementation of good designs, and no language removes that.
Oct
9
answered How is printf() in C/C++ a Buffer overflow vulnerability?
Oct
2
comment How does the Mega-D BotNet send spam?
I do not mean a relay server - they are essentially extinct as you say. I mean renting a server and using it to pump out spam directly.
Oct
2
answered How does the Mega-D BotNet send spam?
Sep
26
answered How can a network observer identify computers running old versions of Java?
Sep
6
answered How likely/possible is it that the NSA have broken common encryption techniques such as SSL/TLS?
Sep
1
answered How does Windows know which part of memory is “intended to hold data only”?
Aug
31
comment Scan Source Code for Potential Viruses
right on the money. malicious source code is unlikely to have a module called "malware".
Aug
30
comment Would IT Security professionel people notice a backdoor in Windows 7 or SBS 2011 implemented by Microsoft?
Another thought; microsoft (and many other vendors) do not even need a back door. We've been trained to give them the keys to the front door. Anytime one of the vendors who routinely load updates on my machines wants to do something either for me or to me, I am powerless to resist - unless I'm willing to risk that certified malware won't get me if I do.
Aug
30
comment Would IT Security professionel people notice a backdoor in Windows 7 or SBS 2011 implemented by Microsoft?
So windows machines are perfectly secure then; I guess I was wrong about everything, and all those security patches are just for show. Meanwhile, back in reality, windows OS security is swiss cheese. Microsoft has never been held liable for uncounted losses due to security breaches. No one knows what all those patches do or what doors have been deliberately or only inadvertantly left open.
Aug
29
answered Would IT Security professionel people notice a backdoor in Windows 7 or SBS 2011 implemented by Microsoft?
Aug
20
awarded  Benefactor
Aug
20
comment Can malware come in any format?
no known way. One famous example was an exploit of widely used jpeg reading code.
Aug
18
comment Cheating or service disruption by altering client-side code
I'm not in the "nothing is better than something" camp. Short of completely abandoning smart clients, something is better than nothing.