260 reputation
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bio website
location Austin, TX
age 34
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen yesterday

I'm currently studying for a Master's in Information Assurance and plan to concentrate on software security.

I'm here to try (and sometimes fail) answering questions; to deepen my knowledge and meet people to code projects with.

Thanks for reading!


Apr
11
comment Finding Hidden Keylogger Through Forcing a Computation Error
Updated my answer to include a paper written last year that demonstrates a GPU-based keylogger. Because of how it simply reads the memory buffer of the keyboard driver, it neatly bypasses any timing-based mitigation.
Apr
11
revised Finding Hidden Keylogger Through Forcing a Computation Error
Came across some new information.
Apr
4
answered How to learn penetration testing at home?
Mar
28
answered how to stop people hacking a website build in cakephp with linux host
Mar
28
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
27
accepted What threats come from CRLF in email generation?
Mar
26
comment When and where do I hash a password?
And how would that work even? You generate a random number and a hash in the browser, pass it to the server. How are you going to validate the password stored in the database if you're computing a random salt on the client every time?
Mar
26
comment When and where do I hash a password?
And since I'm on my soapbox, what JavaScript PRNG would you use? Further, since its JavaScript as an attacker there are means by which you can subvert a site-user's browser session and redefine any functions you want. No, the more I think about it, I will never agree with exposing hash + salt code on the client and leaving the rest up to chance. How does the server know that the salt is valid and not tampered with? How does it know the salt was actually random?
Mar
26
comment When and where do I hash a password?
My point was purely about hiding your application's implementation. We're talking about passwords. If your client code contains both information about which hash you're using, and the salt, you just radically decreased the difficulty of building your rainbow tables. Hashcat for the win.
Mar
26
awarded  Commentator
Mar
26
comment When and where do I hash a password?
How would the hash be obvious to an attacker that only has access to the HTML src?
Mar
25
awarded  Yearling
Mar
25
comment What threats come from CRLF in email generation?
Multiple hits. And I'm security-minded, I'm just trying to decide what the threat basis is in the first place. I can't see how I'd want to exploit this for nefarious ends.
Mar
25
asked What threats come from CRLF in email generation?
Mar
25
answered When and where do I hash a password?
Mar
21
comment How do I Mitigate Directory Traversal when User-Supplied Input is a Mandatory Business Case?
I added additional information, from your answer I don't think I fully communicated what the process looks like.
Mar
21
revised How do I Mitigate Directory Traversal when User-Supplied Input is a Mandatory Business Case?
added 715 characters in body
Mar
21
asked How do I Mitigate Directory Traversal when User-Supplied Input is a Mandatory Business Case?
Mar
20
awarded  Teacher
Mar
19
comment Should generating gpg keys ever result in an identical key to an older key?
It sounds to me that your software was using this random number generator: xkcd.com/221 !Random Numbers