11,980 reputation
23786
bio website neal.mcburnett.org
location Boulder, CO
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visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 2 days ago

I like to engage in "Technology Serving Community" via free software.

Consultant, Ubuntu member, Wikipedia contributor since 2002, ElectionAudits developer, Boulder Community Network co-founder, Internet2 consultant for IDtrust, author of pgpstat, Android enthusiast, ex-Bell Labs web/security/standards maven....

See my web site for way more: http://neal.mcburnett.org/


6h
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
8
reviewed Leave Open Tools to analyze Hooks on Windows 7 / 2008, x64 platform
Sep
8
reviewed Leave Open Tools for performing HTTP FLOOD attack?
Sep
8
reviewed Leave Open Classical Cryptography Tools
Sep
8
reviewed Reviewed Is it wrong to root login with SSH?
Sep
8
comment Is it wrong to root login with SSH?
Welcome to the site and thanks for the answer :) But can you include here the gist of the instructions that seem relevant? For the convenience of our readers, and since pages on other sites may go away at any time, we ask that you please give a full answer here, and just provide links for background info and credit.
Sep
8
reviewed Close What hash version is implemented on ThePirateBay.se? SHA-1 or MDA-5?
Sep
8
reviewed Close Next steps to get rid of malware?
Sep
8
reviewed Close Computer IP address tracking
Sep
8
reviewed Close Does Ally Bank's trusted image system actually make login safer?
Sep
8
comment Does Ally Bank's trusted image system actually make login safer?
Well, just add more phrases like "trusted image" to the other question....
Aug
21
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
7
answered Appropriate response to 2014 Russian Security Breach (CyberVor)
Aug
6
comment What is meant by “Use of privileged utility programs” in the ISO27001:2013 standard?
Besides programs that need root access, this would also seem to include programs that can override other controls, e.g. via set-group-id programs, or running under accounts that have special (but limited) sudo privileges, etc.
Aug
2
comment Can the USB standard be fixed to prevent the “firmware attack”?
@curiousguy My networking attacks comment may be an overinterpretation or stretch. But it seems that the usb device firmware could emulate a bluetooth or ethernet or other network device, and then inject packets into the host.
Aug
1
comment How difficult is the USB firmware attack?
The question as written is about how hard it is to attack a usb device. The question of how hard it is to attack a host, given a usb that does keyboard, network, mouse, etc is also highly dependent on the host - what OS it is running, if it is patched well, how observant the operator is, etc.
Aug
1
comment How difficult is the USB firmware attack?
Again, it all depends on the the device. This is sort of like asking "how difficult is it to attack a computer". Perhaps you're asking "Which USB device is most vulnerable to this attack and how hard is it to make the attack?" but some devices that are easy to attack will be very rare and thus uninteresting. Also, once an attack has been developed for a particular device it will often be very easy to package it so it is very easy for script kiddies to deploy it.
Aug
1
comment How difficult is the USB firmware attack?
It seems that it all depends on the specific USB implementation, so this question is "too broad". There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.
Aug
1
comment Can the USB standard be fixed to prevent the “firmware attack”?
I suggest changing from the word "fixed" to "enhanced", and broadening the subject to other ways users can protect themselves. Or we need another questions to cover that.
Aug
1
comment Can the USB standard be fixed to prevent the “firmware attack”?
The WIRED story goes too far, but you don't go far enough. Much depends on the device, and the host. Not all keyboard or mouse input is evident to the user, especially if it happens after some inactivity. USB devices which can be dynamically reprogrammed in firmware to become a USB communications device class (or USB CDC) can launch networking attacks. Zero-day host vulnerabilities are widespread. So some USB devices should be treated as "hypodermic needles", and others are much safer.