43,327 reputation
860227
bio website infosecfrog.blogspot.com
location Scotland, United Kingdom
age 43
visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen 1 hour ago

Information Security, Risk and Governance Specialist.

Heavily involved in information security and risk solutions for the last 16 years in the UK, US and throughout Europe.

  • Scottish Chairman of the Institute of Information Security Professionals
  • Immediate Past President of ISACA Scotland
  • Mensa Security SIG Secretary
  • Full Member of the IISP (M.Inst.ISP)
  • Security mentor and evangelist
  • Moderator of the Security, Music, Parenting, Outdoors, Video Production, Sound Design and Personal Productivity Stack Exchange sites and Administrator for the Security Stack Exchange Blog
  • Contributor to the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP)
  • EC Council Certified Chief Information Security Officer (C|CISO)
  • ISACA Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
  • ISACA Certified in Risk and Information Systems Controls (CRISC)

  • have also been a member of the Standards and Operations Committees for the Council of Registered Ethical Security Testers (CREST), an ISC2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) and a CLAS Consultant.

Extensive experience in Enterprise Risk and Security, from a deep technical grounding in application, network and platform security, as well as over 10 years working with global banking clients helping them identify, evaluate and mitigate information risks from a business and governance perspective.

Key roles in integration programmes, aligning security policies and business risk appetites across divisions in order to provide pragmatic security solutions.

Has created security development pathways and managed large scale security programmes, including global attack & penetration engagements, privacy and security assessments, incident response and fraud and forensic investigations.

Core clients have included global and UK banks, government departments as well as organisations in the Energy, Telecomms and other markets.

Acts as a mentor and coach for numerous security professionals in Scotland, providing career guidance as well as promoting a passion for the industry.

Provides subject matter experience at both strategic and technical levels, defining, reviewing and assessing enterprise level information security strategy, policies and standards for clients, incorporating the ISO 27000 series, COBIT, ITIL and other industry recognised baselines.

Presented at the inaugural e-Crime Scotland Summit and presents regularly on aspects of Information Security at various events in the UK, especially on the business implications of security issues.

Published in the Financial Times, ISACA Journal, assisted in the production of ISACA's APT white paper, and various other publications.


Apr
24
comment WPA vulnerabilities for pentest
SSID is not a secret.
Apr
23
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
comment WPA vulnerabilities for pentest
SSID has no bearing on difficulty of attack. The question is not about passwords. It is about pen testing WPA.
Apr
23
comment why are passphrases not the standard
it is effort that an attacker would go to for a desirable target - that may not be the normal user, who may just be a useful vector because their protection is weak
Apr
23
comment why are passphrases not the standard
A passphrase is more secure than a password in general (because it is longer) so it is irrelevant whether you are talking about 1 user or many
Apr
23
comment If I have the cell #. switch ID and name, can I locate an physical address?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not actually an Infosec question as per our scope. It is actually a question about what telecoms providers will give you. Simply put - they will not give a private individual this information, so no, you can't locate it.
Apr
22
comment why are passphrases not the standard
Vincent - in your second para you say "if it wasn't for brute force the password would be harder to obtain" - no. The passphrase is going to be harder than the password. And adding something personal is not a fix I'm afraid. Social engineering and research goes a long way to getting passwords!
Apr
22
comment Why can't you work backwards with public key to decrypt a message?
Because that is not how the maths works.
Apr
21
comment If TLS 1.2 is considered unbreakable, why do the NSA and other agencies invest in supercomputers?
Yep. Definitely this - one of my previous teams bought 3 Cray Supercomputers. We used a bit of them for number crunching/rainbow tables/crypt stuff, but really they were used for virtualising entire environments for whole companies, and simulating all traffic and activity that occurred - for various reasons.
Apr
19
reviewed Close Plain text password emailed back during registration
Apr
19
reviewed Leave Closed Should I be afraid of biometric IDs?
Apr
16
reviewed Close PHP - Need help to understand injected code
Apr
15
reviewed Leave Open Security issues with multiple interfaces
Apr
14
reviewed No Action Needed linux hidden OS
Apr
14
reviewed Approve ecies tag wiki
Apr
14
reviewed Approve ecies tag wiki excerpt
Apr
14
reviewed Looks OK Can a signed downloaded file be securely verified if you only control the private key and the download/verification algorithm?
Apr
14
revised Can a signed downloaded file be securely verified if you only control the private key and the download/verification algorithm?
deleted 50 characters in body
Apr
13
comment What's the safest way to transmit a message to another client through a server hidden from high level malicious users?
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