42,910 reputation
860223
bio website infosecfrog.blogspot.com
location Scotland, United Kingdom
age 43
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen 11 hours ago

Information Security, Risk and Governance Specialist.

Heavily involved in information security and risk solutions for the last 16 years in the UK, US and throughout Europe.

  • Scottish Chairman of the Institute of Information Security Professionals
  • Immediate Past President of ISACA Scotland
  • Full Member of the IISP (M.Inst.ISP)
  • Security mentor and evangelist
  • Moderator of the Security, Music, Parenting, Outdoors, Video Production, Sound Design and Personal Productivity Stack Exchange sites and Administrator for the Security Stack Exchange Blog
  • Contributor to the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP)
  • EC Council Certified Chief Information Security Officer (C|CISO)
  • ISACA Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
  • ISACA Certified in Risk and Information Systems Controls (CRISC)

  • have also been a member of the Standards and Operations Committees for the Council of Registered Ethical Security Testers (CREST), an ISC2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) and a CLAS Consultant.

Extensive experience in Enterprise Risk and Security, from a deep technical grounding in application, network and platform security, as well as over 10 years working with global banking clients helping them identify, evaluate and mitigate information risks from a business and governance perspective.

Key roles in integration programmes, aligning security policies and business risk appetites across divisions in order to provide pragmatic security solutions.

Has created security development pathways and managed large scale security programmes, including global attack & penetration engagements, privacy and security assessments, incident response and fraud and forensic investigations.

Core clients have included global and UK banks, government departments as well as organisations in the Energy, Telecomms and other markets.

Acts as a mentor and coach for numerous security professionals in Scotland, providing career guidance as well as promoting a passion for the industry.

Provides subject matter experience at both strategic and technical levels, defining, reviewing and assessing enterprise level information security strategy, policies and standards for clients, incorporating the ISO 27000 series, COBIT, ITIL and other industry recognised baselines.

Presented at the inaugural e-Crime Scotland Summit and presents regularly on aspects of Information Security at various events in the UK, especially on the business implications of security issues.

Published in the Financial Times, ISACA Journal, assisted in the production of ISACA's APT white paper, and various other publications.


1d
comment WPA vulnerabilities for pentest
SSID is not a secret.
1d
comment Encryption and decryption of plain text using stream cipher algorithm
SMIT - I see all your questions so far have been closed. You should probably re-read our tour page. Also have a look at Cryptography Stack Exchange, which may be more suited to some of your questions.
2d
comment WPA vulnerabilities for pentest
SSID has no bearing on difficulty of attack. The question is not about passwords. It is about pen testing WPA.
2d
comment why are passphrases not the standard
it is effort that an attacker would go to for a desirable target - that may not be the normal user, who may just be a useful vector because their protection is weak
2d
comment why are passphrases not the standard
A passphrase is more secure than a password in general (because it is longer) so it is irrelevant whether you are talking about 1 user or many
2d
comment If I have the cell #. switch ID and name, can I locate an physical address?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not actually an Infosec question as per our scope. It is actually a question about what telecoms providers will give you. Simply put - they will not give a private individual this information, so no, you can't locate it.
Apr
22
comment why are passphrases not the standard
Vincent - in your second para you say "if it wasn't for brute force the password would be harder to obtain" - no. The passphrase is going to be harder than the password. And adding something personal is not a fix I'm afraid. Social engineering and research goes a long way to getting passwords!
Apr
22
comment Why can't you work backwards with public key to decrypt a message?
Because that is not how the maths works.
Apr
22
comment How secure is our whatsapp wechat bbm?
This is waaaay too broad. We do have various questions on the security of some platforms, but your second and third sentences are off topic here - they are down to how the provider of those services manage data. A hint though: Snapchat pictures became very popular across the internet in 2014...
Apr
21
comment If TLS 1.2 is considered unbreakable, why do the NSA and other agencies invest in supercomputers?
Yep. Definitely this - one of my previous teams bought 3 Cray Supercomputers. We used a bit of them for number crunching/rainbow tables/crypt stuff, but really they were used for virtualising entire environments for whole companies, and simulating all traffic and activity that occurred - for various reasons.
Apr
19
comment Trust based Security Implementations
Not exactly sure what you are asking for, but if it is a list of all frameworks that use some form of trust relationships, then that is off topic here. Please read our tour page for more information.
Apr
18
comment Can BitTorrent be exploited? With the help of Immunity debugger or other methods?
Sokin - everything is exploitable given enough resources, however we will not provide exploit code here. That is not what this site is for. This is why I suggested you read the tour page to understand the purpose of Security Stack Exchange.
Apr
18
comment Can BitTorrent be exploited? With the help of Immunity debugger or other methods?
This question is not appropriate here. Please read tour
Apr
18
comment Comparison of Nessus and bindview
Pentester - please re-read our tour and How to Ask pages - all but 1 of your questions have been closed as they are not suitable here. Those pages will guide you.
Apr
13
comment What's the safest way to transmit a message to another client through a server hidden from high level malicious users?
Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
Apr
13
comment Simple VPN software
john - so far all your posts are asking for product recommendations. That is not what this site is for. Please read our How to Ask and tour pages.
Apr
13
comment can a fake AP have password?
S4soriN - we can't understand what you are trying to do here. Can you clarify what you are wanting to get - as per @schroeder's comment.
Apr
13
comment Drupal server compromised - I want to investigate the attack technique / compromise
elcodedocle - I have edited the title to help people understand that you don't want the fix, but instead want to investigate.
Apr
11
comment Stuxnet - The background functions
Shane - you have already been told. Don't repost the same question multiple times; read the site first, as all your questions have been answered here already.
Apr
10
comment How can I find subdomains of a site?
Lost - if you can expand on this, by explaining what Wolfram does, this answer may get upvotes.