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seen Nov 4 '11 at 15:09

Oct
7
comment Microsoft Windows RPC (135/tcp) security risks
That did sorta cross the information-content threshhold for a full answer. Unfortunately, it was wrong--139 and 445 were the null enum risks on pre-Windows XP SP2 and Windows 2003 SP1 systems. DCE/RPC endpoint mapping is different, it'll give you information like this: offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/…
Oct
7
comment Microsoft Windows RPC (135/tcp) security risks
Older versions of Windows allowed null enumeration--collection of possibly dangerous information about the server without authenticating. sheetaljoseph.org/scribblings/enumeration.pdf is a decent overview of the dangers from that era.
Oct
7
comment Is it possible to decrypt a SSL/TLS session without doing a MITM-attack?
Depends. SSL & TLS together cover a huge range of ciphers. They all offer different degrees of strength, and sometimes different security guarantees (e.g. perfect forward security).
Sep
20
comment Is this much distrust really necessary?
Good answer. As well as the low-probability, large-scale losses, there's also an economic effect similar to herd immunity at work. If everyone blindly trusted everything, there would be many more criminals exploiting that trust.
Sep
20
comment Are there any statistics about webservers and browsers TLS support?
There are quite a few details here: threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/… Not enough to reproduce the attack, but much more than the Register article.
Sep
13
comment What to do about websites that store plain text passwords
I have the feeling that anyone so negligent about security would, at the most, mark your database entry as inactive. I don't see any way to have assurance that your plaintext password is no longer available to all and sundry--the easiest way would probably be hacking in and deleting it.
Aug
17
comment Password auditing
Using SHA1 hashes will help avoid pre-image attacks (compared to md5) but that's not really your concern with a password database. Since they're just as fast as md5, they won't help you if your password hashes get taken. Luckily, the Unix crypt implementation is more secure than NTLM hashes by default; although real durability enters the picture when you switch to bcrypt, pbkdf2, or scrypt.
Aug
16
comment SSD (Flash Memory) security when data is encrypted in place
I agree that the myth perpetuation deserved a -1, but I'm +1'ing it back up because "consider any drive that has ever held sensitive data in an unencrypted state to be tainted" is exactly correct. It's not that the physical HDD bits have a memory longer than 1 overwrite, it's that the data can exist in many places you didn't expect.
Aug
12
comment Amount of simple operations that is safely out of reach for all humanity?
Mightily impressive answer, wish I could upvote more than once. But even assuming hypercomputing is out of reach, don't forget reversible computing--if you can perform 2^31 of your operations reversibly, you might be able to to reach that 2^256 operations on a classical computer, using a black hole for negentropy and throwing in the whole solar system piece by piece.
Aug
11
comment XKCD #936: Short complex password, or long dictionary passphrase?
Tyr, if the password field allows full unicode, you could generate similar complexity by switching language keyboards after each character and doing, say, [emoji][Cyrillic][Kanji][Greek].
Aug
4
comment CloudFlare benefits or drawbacks
I had no doubt Damon was affiliated with Cloudflare when he said "we." He could have been clearer, but he certainly wasn't trying to hide it and astroturf; the two downvotes are unwarranted.
Aug
4
comment How to write an email regarding IT Security that will be read, and not ignored by the end user?
Use 802.1x. Disable LAN access for people who've gotten the email until they answer a short quiz demonstrating knowledge of the information in the email.
Jul
26
comment Is it enough to only wipe a flash drive once?
As the paper JesperMortensen linked demonstrates, the majority of SSDs which advertise "secure delete" functions do nothing of the sort. If you have sensitive data to write to an SSD, write it to an encrypted volume. That includes temp files, caches, buffers, et. al.
Jul
12
comment How can citizens prevent government-led Internet blackouts?
I highly encourage everyone interested in this sort of thing to get a HAM radio license and participate in local field days: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_Day_(amateur_radio) It's basically a disaster/government shutdown/zombie apocalypse preparation exercise; you learn how to build a telecommunications infrastructure from the ground up.
Jul
5
comment Identity-Based Encryption - how secure is it?
Plus, the fact that you can still read your old messages after resetting your password indicates some bad stuff.
Jul
1
comment Applications of probability/statistics in IT security?
Since statistics is isomorphic to machine learning, the latter is a more productive Google search term. Among the first things you find are a reasonably active blog (blog.mlsec.org) and a textbook (amazon.com/Machine-Learning-Mining-Computer-Security/dp/…).
Jun
30
comment Are signature based antivirus or antimalware effective?
Whitelisting makes a product a host-based intrusion prevention system; not an antivirus.
Jun
27
comment Most secure password hash algorithm(s)?
I think the answers here are a little confus(ed|ing) because the time taken by a hashing algorithm is an upper bound on its security. So, except for broken or reduced algorithms, and adjusting for digest length; all hashing algorithms are of equal security if you're iterating for the same amount of time (and doing that in a way that introduces no new vulnerabilities). Except maybe scrypt, since it's memory-hard.
Jun
21
comment Is This Login Security Enough?
This isn't so much a description of a system as a list of features. It's hard to say whether a list of features belongs to a secure system or an insecure one.
Jun
21
comment Is This Login Security Enough?
Storing with bcrypt is much more secure than storing a sha256 hash; but the first hashing is redundant, yes. kzap, if you're worried about GPUs use scrypt instead of bcrypt; it renders GPUs and FPGAs obsolete with memory-hard functions.