2,538 reputation
11222
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 11 hours ago

May
14
revised How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
added 9 characters in body
May
14
comment How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
Please explain the downvote.
May
14
comment How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
@Iszi The "just break the glass" vulnerability applies to all windows, opened or closed. It is much less relevant to opened windows. If you are worried about this vuln, you don't leave your windows open either (or you shouldn't). If you leave your windows open you should rather worry about the "just go through the open window without breaking the glass". The "hole 196" applies to all variants of WPA, but I can't see its relevance to a Shared (as in shared by every Wifi client) Key set-up. If you worry about insiders you don't share the master key. That would be insane.
May
14
revised How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
edited body
May
14
comment How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
"Most security researchers consider "hole 196" to be more of a technical break than something that is very useful to the attacker." It isn't either things. "I think that the WPA-PSK handshake, [is] far more serious threats" If you are using PSK you cannot be worried about said "hole 196".
May
14
answered How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
May
14
comment How do I protect myself against 'hole 196'?
I don't understand what you are talking about: which "malware injection, port scanning, denial of service, etc." techniques are related with "Hole196"? Port scanning is a legitimate non-intrusive remote examination technique of any network-connected computer. "open" vs. "closed" ports is not a secret. You just have to accept that. ARP poisoning is an Ethernet thing, it isn't specific to Wifi.
May
14
revised Is my computer at risk of being hacked when using public Wi-Fi?
more on cookies, f.ex. Google identity
May
14
revised Is my computer at risk of being hacked when using public Wi-Fi?
added second answer
May
14
answered Is my computer at risk of being hacked when using public Wi-Fi?
May
11
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
3
comment Why AES is not used for secure hashing, instead of SHA-x?
"no POV about it" Your "POV" is that you want the clear-text from the cypher-text. My "POV" is that I want the key from clear-text and cypher-text. My intuition was that most used cyphers implement one-way function. (Thomas explained my intuition really well.)
Apr
3
comment Why AES is not used for secure hashing, instead of SHA-x?
"A cipher is reversible" That a POV; from another POV: can you guess the key from cypher-text? "A cipher requires a key, a hash does not" That's a good one. It seems that "hash does not have a key" is what makes hashing more difficult than encryption.
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
8
comment Can I improve website security by storing SSL Keys in DNS? Is DNSSec required? Are threat models available?
There is no "TLSA RR" used in Chrome, or any unusual RR. The DNSSEC proof is sent (in place of the usual certificate chain) in the TLS session itself, so no DNS special configuration, DNS server support, DNS resolver support ... is needed. The firewall will see no "strange" packets, and this might work in special conditions where full IP connectivity is not a given (like a Wifi captive portal).
Dec
30
comment What are the security risks in enabling ipv6
"less immature" ?
Dec
30
comment What implications does IPv6 have for internet worms and script kiddies?
"trying to authenticate remote systems based on IP address" and not also checking routing headers at the same time...
Dec
29
comment Is IPv6 with NAT less secure than IPv4?
"are assigning at least /56 to end users" Free SAS assigns /60 per box (but you can only use /64 unless you use your modem instead of the box).
Dec
2
comment How is a worm different from a virus?
"Strictly speaking, a "virus" is a piece of executable code that is attached (usually prepended) to an existing program." so a boot sector virus is not a virus?
Dec
2
comment How is a worm different from a virus?
"Biologically, a virus is a piece of RNA." or DNA.