49,163 reputation
14120210
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Nov 12 at 0:16

Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado, devourer of donuts.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Aug
22
revised how to identify whether my page is phished or normal page?
Formatting / grammar
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
@MarkHillick I wasn't attacking your answer. I like your answer. I upvoted your answer! I was just saying that your assertions in the above comments are slightly misplaced.
Aug
22
comment Attaching hotspot to existing network - can it be secured?
If their existing network runs off a hub, you could just connect the internet-facing side of the hub to the AP instead, so the reconfiguration would be minimal. i.e. office PCs connect to hub, hub connects to AP, AP connects to the internet. There's not really a way to drop the device into the network without making any changes at all.
Aug
22
answered Attaching hotspot to existing network - can it be secured?
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
@ScottPack s/MyAdmin// ;)
Aug
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
comment How much can I trust Tor?
@Pacerier "Hi, I'm <name>, I live at <address>."
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
The same goes for risk. You can argue that something less popular is a lower risk, but that's like saying "ok, here's a gun with 256 barrels, and only one bullet, go play Russian roulette". The probability might be low, but the security implications are high. Probability also does not mean a lower incident count - an unbiased coin might still land on heads 500 times in a row - it's just really unlikely. I'm not discounting your answer, I'm discounting the security of relying on a probability.
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
@MarkHillick My point is that the two are independent. There's zero correlation between popularity and security. You have to use proper security metrics to measure security. By definition it's a difficult thing to measure, so attempting to estimate using arbitrary perceptive and subjective metrics is misplaced.
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
@MarkHillick I disagree that it's a risk reduction. It's a risk reduction until someone actually breaks it, at which point it's become a huge problem. It's a false sense of security. Obscurity provides no provable benefit, only a perceptive benefit.
Aug
22
comment tor and widecap dns leak
Just filter for DNS queries and look for one that's asking for the IP of the domain. Keep in mind that the OS won't always send the packet if you've already looked up the IP address before. The functionality of Wireshark is outside the scope of this question. We're going off topic. Perhaps you aught to do a little research and open a new question if you have further problems.
Aug
22
comment tor and widecap dns leak
The bug is in the implementation of HttpWebRequest. It doesn't matter what license the software is under.
Aug
22
comment Is it safer to use less heard of software than popular software?
@pepe I partially agree. For measuring patch speed, just hop into their bug tracker and look for items flagged as security. Then look how long it took to go from reported to fixed. For individual security-critical apps that are sufficiently popular, it's not infeasible to Google for some analysis (blogs, papers, etc). If all else fails and you have a specific concern, ask a question on here.
Aug
22
comment tor and widecap dns leak
Sorry, misunderstood what you'd changed. I'm pretty sure you're still leaking DNS. You should double check with Wireshark.
Aug
22
comment tor and widecap dns leak
Yes, it works because you're using a local IP address. Privoxy won't warn you, because no DNS request is required for the localhost IP.
Aug
22
comment tor and widecap dns leak
Unfortunately, the .NET framework doesn't support it. You're going to have to manually write the SOCKS client and HTTP protocol implementations yourself. I can't really help you on that here, since it's off-topic, but feel free to open up a question on StackOverflow.
Aug
22
comment Are there any tools that focus on shellcode analysis?
@AviD There are so few tools available that I don't think it's even worth a list. At the risk of presenting an "appeal to authority" argument, see here for a similar situation.
Aug
22
answered tor and widecap dns leak
Aug
22
revised Is it possible for a phishing link to install a major virus on a Mac?
Mac, not MAC.
Aug
22
comment What are the security precautions taken to ensure a virtualized domain can't compromise its host
Your description of VMs is a little outdated. These days the VM's guest code runs native on the physical CPU, rather than being emulated. It works a little bit like a JIT compiler - a block of code is read, wrapped and translated to ensure sandboxing, then executed directly on the CPU. Modern CPUs help facilitate this by offering virtualization extensions.