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bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
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Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado, devourer of donuts.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Aug
7
comment Mars Curiosity Rover Security
Related tweet.
Aug
7
comment Can signing too much compromise a private key?
That's a dangerous assumption to make.
Aug
7
comment Why shouldn't we roll our own?
@Ramhound I'm aware, I'm just asking the question for the sake of having a go-to answer. It'd be great if you could offer a second answer to compete with dr jimbob's.
Aug
7
answered Virus developers groups
Aug
7
revised Virus developers groups
chaff
Aug
7
comment Publicly available Botnet Traffic dataset
Just to clarify, are you looking for packet dumps to/from infected machines, packet dumps to/from C&C servers, or samples of the malware itself?
Aug
7
comment Why shouldn't we roll our own?
@AndrewSmith The comments are not for sharing of personal opinions or random chatter. They are for asking for clarification about a question. You've been warned about this before, and I've seen you do it again on several other questions. If you want to chat, please do so in the DMZ.
Aug
6
answered What are the security advantage of new redirecting method used by Gmail and Facebook?
Aug
6
comment Dangers of a vulnerability in a local installer?
Ah, ok. Still, if you're shipping to customers, 99% of this still stands.
Aug
6
comment Why shouldn't we roll our own?
For reference, D.W. posted a great starting point here.
Aug
6
revised Why shouldn't we roll our own?
xkcd
Aug
6
revised Dangers of a vulnerability in a local installer?
added 84 characters in body
Aug
6
comment How many possibilities can today's computers check (per second) in a SHA512 hash of a 50-byte-long random entry?
The salt would never be typed in by a person. It's generated randomly and stored in the database with the hash.
Aug
6
revised Dangers of a vulnerability in a local installer?
gif for the lulz
Aug
6
asked Why shouldn't we roll our own?
Aug
6
answered Dangers of a vulnerability in a local installer?
Aug
6
revised How many possibilities can today's computers check (per second) in a SHA512 hash of a 50-byte-long random entry?
update
Aug
6
comment How many possibilities can today's computers check (per second) in a SHA512 hash of a 50-byte-long random entry?
You're making this a lot more complicated than necessary. I suggest you read through the answer I linked (this one) and improve your understanding of password hashing and salting schemes before continuing.
Aug
6
comment How many possibilities can today's computers check (per second) in a SHA512 hash of a 50-byte-long random entry?
Where are you storing it, then? I sincerely hope that the salt is unique to each user.
Aug
6
revised How to store salt?
s/hash/salt/