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 aes
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Apr
26
comment Would it be possible to fix the security flaws inherent in USB technology?
@AndréBorie Even if there was a perfect implementation of this from a security perspective (f.e. what if a hub is connected which purposefully does not behave according to spec and allows arbitrary devices? and how do you handle hybrid devices?) it would be a usability nightmare. People still have trouble understanding the concept of zip files, or how to copy/paste files, let alone understanding the difference between HID, mass storage, webcams, USB-to-serial, audio devices, etc. and the various combinations between them.
Apr
26
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
25
answered Store password ciphers using Powershell ? DPAPI/AES
Apr
25
answered Does using a live CD make you more vulnerable to remote attacks?
Apr
25
comment Why does privacy matter?
List question, and almost entirely opinion based, bordering on non-security (it's more of a sociology / political question). Voting to close.
Apr
25
comment Is DNS leak really an issue?
@MikhailMorfikov Imagine, for example, that the VPN client is installed on your computer. You've got a router in place and your DHCP lease tells your computer to use the router (e.g. 192.168.0.1) as your DNS server, so it can perform queries. You connect to a "privacy" VPN, but that VPN doesn't want you to be able to reach their own internal LAN, so they set up routes such that everything other than private IP space is routed, e.g. 10.0.0.0/8 and 192.168.0.0/16 aren't routed. Your computer does a DNS request to its DNS server, 192.168.0.1, but it isn't routed through the tunnel; DNS leakage.
Apr
24
comment How difficult is it to brute-force Windows EFS encryption?
@RickyDemer So what? This is not the location for this conversation.
Apr
24
answered Is DNS leak really an issue?
Apr
24
comment security authentication protocol
Please edit your question to actually explain the protocol. Your notation uses a seemingly invented form that is very difficult to read and understand. You need to properly define the protocol in order for it to be properly understood.
Apr
24
comment Would it be possible to fix the security flaws inherent in USB technology?
@Francesco I'm leaning towards closing this question as you've not specified any actual attacks against USB, so it's incredibly broad. For example, with access to a USB port I might present a keyboard/mouse/display/NIC combo and take over your system, exploit driver bugs to take over your box, or feed 1kV into it and fry your board. Are these what you're thinking of? What's your threat model?
Apr
24
comment Would it be possible to fix the security flaws inherent in USB technology?
This would largely invalidate the 'U' in USB.
Apr
24
comment security authentication protocol
You're going to have to re-write that protocol explanation. Your first line says "the client sends the client to the server", which doesn't make any sense. You're better off writing it out in text than trying to write notation. Also, you need to define what "crypted" means.
Apr
24
comment What prevents ISPs from tracking chain of proxies' (or Tor relays') IP addresses?
@Mok-KongShen They are informed of this fact. It's in the Tor FAQ.
Apr
24
comment What's the difference between the same model with and without FIPS 140 certification?
@SEJPM It's an educated guess based on the fact that I've taken a decent range of chip & pin EMV machines apart, and they do the same thing. Different models of machines in the same series tend to maintain the same security control but have unpopulated sections depending on feature support, all using the same board. As an example, two VeriFone devices I pulled apart had the exact same board, except one had a breakout for a WiFi module and some additional supporting power components for it. These were unpopulated in the cheaper wired model.
Apr
24
comment Unable to overwrite EIP register
@user3006498 Unfortunately I can't really help much without an interactive session with your environment. My advice would be to trace through and look at exactly what gets put on the stack, and what code branches get taken when you change the values from 'A' to '\xA0'.
Apr
24
comment Can a computer virus be stored somewhere else than on the hard drive?
@forest If you infect these areas you can implement malware with specific capabilities. For example, infecting a NIC's firmware gives you DMA access to the entire system memory, and a covert exfiltration channel that can't be seen by the OS. GPU malware can again DMA, so it has full control over the system, although it can't directly communicate out (well, actually, it can, if you hook up an internet-connected TV via HDMI, due to HEC). GPUs also have firmware. Point being that these places store code, and modifying that code allows for a persistent stealthy rootkit.
Apr
22
comment Can a computer virus be stored somewhere else than on the hard drive?
@rugk This is almost impossible to do without ever touching the disk, though. While attempts have been made, issues like paging and having to drop libraries to inject into the processes into temporary directories, ultimately means that memory-resident malware is often not entirely memory-resident.
Apr
22
comment Unable to overwrite EIP register
@user3006498 I made some edits. Read through and have a try.
Apr
22
revised Unable to overwrite EIP register
added 3274 characters in body