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Feb
13
reviewed Approve Can anybody explain XSS?
Feb
13
reviewed Approve How to use USB-Stick instead of passphrase?
Feb
11
comment PHP injection on 777 file
What's the question here?
Feb
11
revised Email hacking myth
Added CiC's point.
Feb
11
comment Email hacking myth
Yeah, having the secret questions guessed is another one. I'll add it to the list.
Feb
11
answered Email hacking myth
Feb
7
comment Is XSS possible here? Challenge
The lack of a practical exploit is a technicality - if someone discovers a heap spray bug in an application, they still call it a security vulnerability even if they don't have a practical exploit. Even if we can't find a way around the regex, it doesn't mean someone else won't. Notice that Brian's answer already got partway to some valid / useful JavaScript. A determined attacker will spend hours or even days trying to break this filter, whereas we're only giving it a cursory glance. If you're doing a test or review of the code, you need to count it as a vulnerability.
Feb
7
comment Why are vulnerabilities and lack of security possible in computers?
Why can people still rob banks? Why do people still die in car crashes? Why can people still get away with people trafficking and murder? Why do seemingly solid legal cases still fall through due to technicalities? As many constraints and safety mechanisms as we implement, there will always be holes, there will always be new ways of abusing systems, and there will always be people who operate outside social norms.
Feb
6
comment Secure design for handling mail attachments
@BrianAdkins I can't say I've exhaustively researched it, but I'm pretty sure that most Adobe Reader exploits have not been through scripting, but rather through bugs with the rendering engine and other internal libraries. For example, SVG rendering bugs were common when support was introduced.
Feb
6
comment Secure design for handling mail attachments
@BrianAdkins Actually, Adobe Reader X brought some pretty decent improvements in the sandboxing engine and various heap protection mechanisms. They put a hell of a lot of work into it. I'll be the first to agree that Adobe Reader has, historically, been horribly vulnerable, but the newer versions do seem to be holding up pretty well.
Feb
6
revised Is XSS possible here? Challenge
Better URL
Feb
6
answered Is XSS possible here? Challenge
Feb
6
comment What unique risks does MVC model binding bring to a website? What additional vigilance is needed?
Related: security.stackexchange.com/questions/21100/…
Feb
6
reviewed Reject how to mitigate a DDoS from botnet on your website that comes from random IPs
Feb
5
comment Fixing the high-bit problem in PHP's crypt() implementation
@Gilles Unfortunately reality gets in the way of such luxuries.
Feb
5
comment Fixing the high-bit problem in PHP's crypt() implementation
The downside of this is that SHA-256 requires mcrypt support, which a lot of servers won't have. I can use SHA-1, but that makes me a bit nervous... would I need to worry about length extension attacks?
Feb
5
comment Fixing the high-bit problem in PHP's crypt() implementation
@Gilles Provide a decent alternative and I'll be happy to upvote it.
Feb
5
answered Attack Vectors for Purely Static Website (HTML and CSS)
Feb
5
comment Determine hashing algorthim only with known input and output
@almathie That isn't true. When the salt is secret and static, it is no longer a salt; it is the key for a MAC.
Feb
5
accepted Fixing the high-bit problem in PHP's crypt() implementation