49,828 reputation
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bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen yesterday

Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado, devourer of donuts.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Nov
8
comment Can you extract memory contents from a hibernated Windows machine?
@ewanm89 It's only a security problem if you actually use the hibernate feature. It doesn't write anything from RAM to disk until you actually hit the hibernate button. The reason the file is on disk is that it has to pre-allocate the space in order to know which sectors are which, because the full driver stack isn't available during the process.
Nov
8
comment Can you extract memory contents from a hibernated Windows machine?
@Iszi Absolutely. If you read the slides from that BlackHat presentation, he demonstrates the ability to modify Windows' EPROCESS structures inside kernel memory. You can change absolutely anything in RAM, including instructions.
Nov
8
comment Attacking an office printer?
@haylem Most of our "office" printers are just bog-standard off-the-shelf consumer-grade laser or inkjet printers, so they're not exactly hardcore. We do have a photocopier with internal storage, though.
Nov
8
comment Attacking an office printer?
@haylem I wouldn't say most printers have them. Most that I come across have no non-volatile storage outside of the small EEPROM used for storing settings and firmware, which is usually soldered onto the board. More modern photocopiers do tend to have a small hard disk (at least 5GB usually) or a much larger EEPROM which stores the mounted filesystem.
Nov
8
comment Can you extract memory contents from a hibernated Windows machine?
@ewanm89 That's an alternative, yes ;)
Nov
8
reviewed Approve Tools for analyzing Perl 5 code?
Nov
8
comment Will antivirus detect all keyloggers?
@schroeder "We develop a Code in C# like keyloggers and email to our personnel to detect stupid personnel" - I'm advising against keylogging your employees' machines.
Nov
8
answered Can you extract memory contents from a hibernated Windows machine?
Nov
8
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
8
reviewed Approve Physical machines not detected from a Backtrack VM
Nov
8
answered Will antivirus detect all keyloggers?
Nov
8
answered User authentication + database encryption with same password
Nov
8
comment How can vending machines be hacked? And how can I prevent it?
@Gilles That's true, but I've yet to see a single device that protects the JTAG debugger port in any way shape or form. It's usually a direct way to interfere with the CPU and memory of the device.
Nov
8
revised Are there any benifits to backing up when you have all the original installation disks?
added 2 characters in body; edited title
Nov
8
comment “Don't serve content over HTTP” - what does this mean, exactly?
@KevinM1 They can't afford a VPS for 15 dollars a month?
Nov
8
revised How can vending machines be hacked? And how can I prevent it?
added 232 characters in body
Nov
8
answered How can vending machines be hacked? And how can I prevent it?
Nov
8
comment Attacking an office printer?
@mikebabcock Keep in mind that some printers don't use 9100, so you might not need anything other than 515. Of course, you may also need to temporarily allow inbound connections to port 80 if you're changing printer settings.
Nov
7
comment Getting automatically logged in to others session via WIFI
Sadly the state of most countries' critical telecommunications infrastructure security is pretty terrible. I recently heard a story from a pentester who was tasked with breaking into a large mobile (cellphone) network in the UK, which he managed by picking the lock on a cell tower gate and plugging an ethernet cable into the cabinet's switch. It was on the internal network and implicitly trusted, and they had thousands of these sites nationwide. Apparently they have some mitigations in place now, but it's still scary.