49,163 reputation
14120210
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Nov 12 at 0:16

Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado, devourer of donuts.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Nov
4
comment Why wouldn't it be great, if HTTP/2 would only allow communication via TLS?
I think that it's important to state categorically that the primary intended benefit isn't to thwart agencies like the NSA, but rather to protect against criminal threats.
Nov
4
comment My college hosts a critically vulnerable service. I warned them 4 years ago. What should I do?
Keep in mind that schools and colleges are notorious for being over-reacting asshats in response to security notices. Kids have been kicked out or even arrested over them. My advice would be to tread very carefully.
Nov
4
comment Domain socket authentication as in MySQL and PostgreSQL secure?
As far as I'm aware, TCP/IP vs. Unix sockets are just seen as different communications layers, which the actual protocol is agnostic to. That being said, I've only taken enough of a look at the protocol to emulate a couple of the packet types, and that was entirely on TCP/IP.
Nov
4
comment Domain socket authentication as in MySQL and PostgreSQL secure?
Anecdotal evidence: I know that by default MySQL will do some form of challenge-response auth which is difficult to break, but the actual communications after that are not encrypted by default. You also have to have encryption enabled on BOTH the client and server for it to be enabled. There's also no integrity protection - I wrote a small tool for injecting queries into existing connections.
Nov
4
comment Is there a reason to use TrueCrypt over VeraCrypt?
I'm with @CodesInChaos on this one. I may be ill, and it may be a coffee-less Tuesday morning, but I cannot fathom why anyone would think OTP would be even vaguely useful in FDE.
Nov
3
comment How do I block a blogspot site using hosts file?
Your browser probably has its own DNS cache, which is skipping the OS-level resolver. Try Ctrl+F5 to force refresh, or restart your system.
Oct
26
comment When MBR pirates grin as an indication of absolute pleasure!
Just wipe the disk and start over.
Oct
26
comment Is it even possible to hack a television channel?
@EllieKesselman It's from the movie "Hackers", which everyone should definitely see. Cheesy as hell, soundtrack by The Prodigy, stars Angelina Jolie from when she was practically a kid.
Oct
25
comment What attacks, if any, are possible against Security Support Provider Interface (SSPI)?
@paj28 Sorry, yes, I should've been more clear. I guess I'm mainly referring to Negotiate and Digest SSP (SASL) as they're the two most common. But, as well as that, I'm interested in the security of how SSPI as an interface safely decides which protocol to use when there are mismatches in support between two endpoints.
Oct
25
comment Is it even possible to hack a television channel?
I would've thought this would be a better clip to pick :)
Oct
23
comment How “enforcable” are email disclaimers
@CarlosBribiescas That is an amusing thought. Sadly, I don't know the answer. It's probably never been tested in court.
Oct
19
comment How do I use “openssl s_client” to test for (absence of) SSLv3 support?
@RogerLipscombe Right, so what's not working there? SSLv3 is not listed, so it's not supported.
Oct
10
comment Add a file as entropy source for /dev/random
Care to explain what specific requirement you have that /dev/urandom doesn't solve? The term "true-random entropy" doesn't make any sense in this context.
Oct
10
comment Add a file as entropy source for /dev/random
You can't really "consume" entropy. Besides, /dev/urandom is designed to provide an essentially unlimited CSRPNG through the use of AES-CTR keyed from /dev/random, which means you're guaranteed to have strong random numbers as long as you've got even a bare minimum of collected entropy. You'd have to run some kind of tiny cut-down kernel on a low-entropy embedded device and pull gigabytes of random data from /dev/urandom to impact security in a negative way.
Oct
10
comment Add a file as entropy source for /dev/random
Can I just ask... why? What is the problem that you are solving by doing this? I mean, "for funsies" is completely fine, I just want to be sure you're not doing it because you expect some kind of tangible security improvement.
Oct
10
comment With RSA, can one ensure that two entities will not have the same private key?
@RickyDemer That is true, though when I said "isn't really defined" I was referring to the fact that (as Stephen pointed out) we don't have a defined, agreed upon function for calculating its true value, short of actually counting all the primes, which defeats the point of the PCF in the first place.
Oct
10
comment Password resets - what practices should web services follow?
@ThomasEyde I'd suggest against that from a usability angle. Not everyone has internet access on their phone.
Oct
7
comment What would one need to do in order to hijack a satellite?
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes.
Oct
6
comment Can AES encryption prevent modifying bits in a wireless protocol?
To be specific, if you choose AES-CBC you'll have block-level malleability allowing you to apply any arbitrary xor tweak to a block (and thus giving you arbitrary modification if you know any plaintext) with the side-effect of corrupting the adjacent block. Or, if you can modify the IV arbitrarily, you can gain xor malleability on the first block with no side-effects. If you choose AES-CTR or any other stream mode, you'll have full xor malleability across the whole stream. So you need authenticity either through MAC or an authenticated mode (e.g. GCM).
Oct
2
comment Does dual boot hurt security?
Easiest references are the malleability article on Wikipedia and this great article on practical exploitation of LUKS in Ubuntu.