49,763 reputation
14120210
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 5 at 13:42

Pentester, ex-developer, security researcher, reverse engineer, electronics tinkerer, internet activist, zombie eradicator, promulgator of useless facts, shrubbery inspector, bacon aficionado, devourer of donuts.

Strengths: Security, Crypto, Win32 API, C#, .NET, PHP, x86 assembly

All answers and comments are encrypted with ROT256-ECB.

Opinions are my own. Advice provided with no warranty.


Oct
10
comment With RSA, can one ensure that two entities will not have the same private key?
@RickyDemer That is true, though when I said "isn't really defined" I was referring to the fact that (as Stephen pointed out) we don't have a defined, agreed upon function for calculating its true value, short of actually counting all the primes, which defeats the point of the PCF in the first place.
Oct
10
comment Password resets - what practices should web services follow?
@ThomasEyde I'd suggest against that from a usability angle. Not everyone has internet access on their phone.
Oct
7
comment What would one need to do in order to hijack a satellite?
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes.
Oct
6
comment Can AES encryption prevent modifying bits in a wireless protocol?
To be specific, if you choose AES-CBC you'll have block-level malleability allowing you to apply any arbitrary xor tweak to a block (and thus giving you arbitrary modification if you know any plaintext) with the side-effect of corrupting the adjacent block. Or, if you can modify the IV arbitrarily, you can gain xor malleability on the first block with no side-effects. If you choose AES-CTR or any other stream mode, you'll have full xor malleability across the whole stream. So you need authenticity either through MAC or an authenticated mode (e.g. GCM).
Oct
2
comment Does dual boot hurt security?
Easiest references are the malleability article on Wikipedia and this great article on practical exploitation of LUKS in Ubuntu.
Oct
2
comment Does dual boot hurt security?
According to Wikipedia dm-crypt uses CBC by default, so it's vulnerable. There are two main attacks. The first is to just corrupt data blocks, which is possible for any block. The second is to xor ciphertext blocks with a tweak, and that results in the target block's plaintext also being xor'ed with that tweak, and the adjacent block being totally corrupted. This can be useful if you know that a particular bootloader or kernel image is in a specific location on the encrypted disk, because you might be able to modify code.
Oct
2
comment How can I recover files encrypted by Android ransomware?
That's only for CryptoLocker, not any arbitrary ransomware.
Oct
2
comment Does dual boot hurt security?
Caveat: Encrypting your partitions, in most implementations, DOES NOT fully prevent attackers from modifying data on the encrypted disk. Any disk crypto that runs in CBC mode will be vulnerable to block-level xor malleability.
Oct
2
comment Effect on PCI compliance of not checking SSL certificate?
It's probably also worth getting in touch with the PCI Council and mentioning this. You might be one of the first to object to this request, and others may have just gone ahead with it.
Oct
2
comment masking credit cards PAN with zeros
@Timee That makes no sense at all; it's like saying having a database of every number from 0000 to 9999 violates PCI because you're guaranteed to have someone's PIN in there.
Oct
1
comment Where are the user credentials stored when remember password is selected?
If you downvoted this, please leave a comment to explain why.
Oct
1
comment How does stored procedure prevents SQL injection?
@AnanduMDas No, that's not necessary. The database server, in a traditional string query, has to parse out the query language and data itself. This is why we have to sanitise the data, because it's ambiguous and could be mistaken for query language. When the two are separated out as part of the protocol (i.e. the query string and the data fed into it are split into separate sections of the packet), the data doesn't need to be sanitised because the database already knows that it's data, and won't treat it as query language.
Sep
25
comment Can't I forge an SSL certificate?
@JavaIsCool Browser updates and OS updates. Here's an example of an MSKB hotfix to deploy new root CAs.
Sep
25
comment Can't I forge an SSL certificate?
@raz 10-30 years is a more accurate range. Most are around 20 years, from looking at my TRCA list.
Sep
25
comment Can't I forge an SSL certificate?
@JavaIsCool To an extent, yes. Operating systems usually push out updated root CA lists in updates (e.g. Windows hotfixes) and browsers usually ship them with updates. Revocation of compromised or replaced certificates is achieved with Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and similar mechanisms.
Sep
25
comment Four-factor authentication
@user2813274 Except George Washington's account would be long closed and locked, and your example has nothing to do with time locks in this context.
Sep
25
comment Is it possible to Spoof a TeamViewer ID?
Windows Server 2007 isn't an operating system. Did you mean 2003, 2008, or 2008 R2? ;) (not that it really matters)
Sep
25
comment C++ memset() memory overflow
@Mark It's absolutely on topic here. Whether someone could answer it better elsewhere is irrelevant. In these situations you can advise OP to ask over on another site, because they'd have better expertise, but that's not a valid reason alone to flag something to be closed as off-topic.
Sep
25
comment C++ memset() memory overflow
@Mark Ah, yes, so it does - it's a local scope instance. Blame my lack of coffee this morning! Rather odd that this is flagged, then.
Sep
25
comment C++ memset() memory overflow
Come now, who voted this as off-topic? It's about the security of a particular operation in code. If that's not security, I don't know what is. Get some itch cream for your trigger finger.