85,501 reputation
9121232
bio website
location
age 69
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Mar 15 at 23:57

I SHALL DEVOUR YOUR HEART AND FEAST ON YOUR SOUL (so don't bug me).


Mar
25
awarded  Revival
Mar
23
awarded  Guru
Mar
21
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
16
awarded  Revival
Mar
16
comment What certificates are needed for multi-level subdomains?
As I wrote, what RFC 2818 states and what browsers do are different things. Browsers are a lot more restrictive. RFC 6125 is closer to what actually happens in practice. (The server species does not matter here, only the certificate contents and the Web browser.)
Mar
13
comment Begin of Certificate/ End of Certificate dash “-----”
Note that for a long time, the use of encapsulation boundary for certificates was not standardized anywhere; it was best defined as "whatever OpenSSL does and can process". Not including exactly five dashes incurs the risk of being rejected by OpenSSL or one of the other implementations that can understand that format (including the certificate support code in Windows).
Mar
12
comment rainbow table for AES 256 CBC knowing IV, cipher text and plain text
Well, if they use both the same key and IV, and begin with the same sequence of bytes, then the encrypted versions will also be identical, up to the first 16-byte block where the plaintexts diverge. From the outside, you will be able to see on which block this occurs (the encrypted blocks will diverge at that point), so you indirectly gain some information on the unknown message (you learn that you actually know it up to the diverging block). That's about it.
Mar
12
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
12
comment rainbow table for AES 256 CBC knowing IV, cipher text and plain text
If you know the plaintext, then it is a known-plaintext attack. For a chosen-plaintext attack, you must be able to choose the plaintext. For once, cryptographers managed to come up with clear terminology.
Mar
12
answered rainbow table for AES 256 CBC knowing IV, cipher text and plain text
Mar
12
answered Does the secure attention key really increase security?
Mar
9
awarded  certificate-authority
Mar
4
awarded  protocols
Feb
25
comment SSL/TLS in-memory data interception after decryption
@Pacerier: simply terminology confusion. What I call "virtual memory" is what is known as "swap space" on Linux; but on Windows things are traditionally called differently. What matters here is data that is in RAM and then gets written to disk (as opposed to data which is conceptually in RAM but is read from disk when necessary).
Feb
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
11
awarded  Revival
Feb
5
awarded  rsa
Jan
29
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
13
awarded  Nice Answer