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Mar
22
comment Why do PGP master keys only have a single subkey, and tie certification with signing by default?
Normally, emails signed with PGP include some stuff that helps the recipient find out about the sender's key, either a copy of the key itself, or at least a reference to a key server. Recipient should still validate the key (with the WoT, or a phone-call-and-dictate-hash-value) but at least in some cases the signature public key itself is copied in the email.
Mar
17
answered SSL negotiating too low a protocol?
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17
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
17
answered How to decrypt SSL traffic with a packet sniffer when I have the private key?
Mar
17
answered Could I use a TimeStamp also as IV?
Mar
16
comment Why does Google prefer ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256?
@MichaelKjörling: note also that there is a difference between "there is a working quantum computer" and "there is a working quantum computer that works at the gigahertz-type of frequency that we now expect from classical computers". There are three successive challenges for QC: assembling enough qubits, preventing decoherence for sufficient time to run the attack, performing enough quantum operations per second for the attack to succeed. Equating quantum-AES-256 with classic-AES-128 means assuming that the 2nd and 3rd challenges are trivial, which seems a bit optimistic to me.
Mar
16
answered Why does Google prefer ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256?