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I SHALL DEVOUR YOUR HEART AND FEAST ON YOUR SOUL (so don't bug me).


Jul
17
comment Is it good practice to send passwords in separate emails, and why?
Most "best practices" are old lore turned into dogma through sedimentation, and parroted by people who like to think of themselves as "cybersecurity experts".
Jul
17
comment What Country, State and City should I choose when requesting an SSL certificate?
Theoretically, a PKCS#10 certificate request is supposed to be signed with the corresponding private key; this is called a "proof of possession" (i.e. you may request a certificate with a given public key only if you actually control the corresponding private key). What you would gain from buying a certificate with the public key of somebody else is unclear. Also, this self-signature cannot work for an encryption-only key (e.g. Diffie-Hellman). Many CA will verify the self-signature, mostly out of Tradition.
Jul
17
comment What Country, State and City should I choose when requesting an SSL certificate?
A PKCS#10 certificate request contains the public key you want to see appear in the certificate. It may contain a lot of other things (it is an extensible format, with extensions) but the CA is free to pick what it wants from the request and ignore the rest. The public key is about the only thing that the CA necessarily uses from the request, and most CA will use only that and ignore the rest.
Jul
17
comment What Country, State and City should I choose when requesting an SSL certificate?
There is no standardized method for the CA to put in the certificate the parts of the requests that it does not want to put in the certificate. If you take my meaning. Basically, if the CA decides to fully ignore the name you provided, then it fully ignores that name and you won't see it anywhere.
Jul
17
answered What Country, State and City should I choose when requesting an SSL certificate?
Jul
17
comment Guessing random bit with 100% accuracy
Yeah, I was so pleased with myself for thinking about this (I mean, even more pleased that I usually am) that I failed to notice that without this side-channel I actually had the correct answer.
Jul
17
revised Guessing random bit with 100% accuracy
added 351 characters in body
Jul
17
answered Guessing random bit with 100% accuracy
Jul
17
comment Guessing random bit with 100% accuracy
Probability of success is 75% is both programs answer randomly (since the prize is obtained when either or both guesses correctly).
Jul
17
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
16
answered Is there a cryptosystem that allows a set of auditors to confirm that they have valid Shamir or Group signatures?
Jul
16
answered Law of Large Numbers vs. OpenSSL RAND_bytes
Jul
16
answered multiple encryption layers and removing them in any order?
Jul
15
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
15
answered How to start writing crypto software
Jul
14
comment Electronic identity and digital signatures - why they are different?
I am in support of the same key for two operations when (and exactly when) it makes no sense to have two separate keys. I know, however, that there are people who like to overdo things and insist on multiple keys even in cases where it does not make any good.
Jul
14
comment Is RC2-CBC at all secure?
Well, for emails, there is no return path. SSL clients and server can negotiate cipher suites, but when you send an email it should work first time. Theoretically, people can send "S/MIME preferences" that contain their public key (certificates) and supported algorithms, but I am not sure I really saw that work even once.
Jul
14
revised Electronic identity and digital signatures - why they are different?
added 1357 characters in body