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awarded  Enlightened
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Nov
3
comment What DH Group size do TLS Ephemeral DHE ciphers use?
The server sends the modulus, generator, and its public DH value in the ServerKeyExchange. The client then learns all of these; the client will send its public DH value in the ClientKeyExchange, which occurs later on in the handshake. (Note that the client must know the complete modulus, not just its size. In DH, all computations must be done modulo the same prime p.)
Nov
3
answered What DH Group size do TLS Ephemeral DHE ciphers use?
Nov
3
answered Is the content of my RAM kept if the OS is shut down but the PC is still running?
Nov
3
answered Which CA issued certificate for https://www.google.com
Nov
3
answered What CryptoPP APIs Output Round By Round Results for AES Encryption/Decryption?
Nov
3
answered Is it easier to get the original password if you have multiple hashes of it, all created with the same hash function?
Nov
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2
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Nov
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Oct
30
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Oct
29
answered How does a debit/credit card reader verify the PIN so quickly?
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29
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Oct
28
answered Is a SSL Certificate for a static IP Address a good idea
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27
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Oct
26
answered Can I have CA with JSSE
Oct
23
comment In message signing, is the digest encrypted with a generated symmetric key or with the sender's private key?
No, it is not "encrypted with the private key". This is a flawed analogy that does not work for algorithms other than RSA, and, when looked at closely, does not work for RSA either. It is an old way of explaining signatures that, in practice, spreads more confusion than enlightenment.
Oct
23
comment In message signing, is the digest encrypted with a generated symmetric key or with the sender's private key?
Yes it is. The notion about "too many CPU cycles" is just the traditional way to explain things, but, as many traditional things, it is wrong. It can be traced back to the first PGP implementation, at a time where the security of chaining modes was not well understood, which explains the weirdness of what PGP does. In the head of Zimmerman, it was a problem of CPU, but since then we learned a lot and now know better; you can always add more CPU, but making a secure RSA-based chaining is a lot harder.