171 reputation
129
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Oct 12 at 10:08

May
16
awarded  Custodian
May
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Jan
29
accepted Install my own proxy
Jan
28
comment Install my own proxy
I don't know, I just know that it is a good firewall that blocks practically everything the user wants. The bridges didn't work, and changing the port didn't work either.
Jan
27
comment Install my own proxy
The firewall is made by an external firewall company, and is extremely smart. It blocks Tor bridges by looking at the packages. It recognizes Tor traffic by its contents, and not the IP. Since it is automated setting up my own proxy without encryption will probably work. I resolved this by using Google Translate as a proxy :)
Jan
26
accepted Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Jan
25
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
So this basically means that in most corporate settings everyone can access the C$ because everyone are local administrators on every workstation?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Okay, thanks for your insight! Considering the permission granting access to C$ is Administrators (COMPUTER-NAME) (or similar) everone has got to be an administrator. I'll look into this with the IT department. This can really be misused by our competitors.. Thanks again!
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
@Iszi So the best practice is then to add the user to the local administrators group manually (physically have the computer in front of you)? I'll try running the dsa.msc-file. If I have access to the whole AD I'll be a bit worried about the experience of the IT department...
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
@Iszi Hehe, that sounds like this is pretty bad! Is it possible to set up AD so that a user only has got administrative rights on a computer based on it's name? Is it set up in AD that everyone's an administrator on every workstation?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
I just got my computer reset from an image they use for every computer on the company. I entered my username and password, and got administrative rights for my own computer. Everyone who logs onto any computer gets administrative rights on that computer. Is this set up in AD? So everyone are system administrators, but not domain administrators?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
@Iszi Okay. So it's simply because Microsoft believes IT departments to be smart enough to disable it for regular users! Thank you for your comments. It seems I'll have to bring this up with the IT department...
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
All users on the domain can access everyone elses C$. I'm just a regular employee in the company. I don't have anything to do with the IT department. So I don't know much about exactly HOW AD works and how it's set up at our company.
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
So by knowing a lot about computers and nothing about corporate user account management in Windows, my best guess would be that AD says that everyone's a local administrator on every computer connected to the domain? And then my best guess is that a "Domain Administrator" is an account that can change AD entries?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Looking at the permissions of C: there was a tab to test permissions on any user in the domain. I found that everyone lost their permissions when removing the Administrators (COMPUTER-NAME\username)-line. Note that it's COMPUTER-NAME and not DOMAIN-NAME.
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Now comes the domain. Is it so that AD is telling the computers that I log onto that my account is a regular User on the domain, but an Administrator on each local computer? The reason why I believe this is what's happening is that everyone logging onto a new computer gets administrative rights. And this is really set in AD?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
I found an administrator account on the computer, and when asking the IT department what it was for, they said it was to have access to my computer if I forgot my password. (They know the password, and it's probably the same on all computers.)
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Is it so that there are groups set up on each computer that has got a set of permissions, and Users and Administrators are shipped with Windows by default. Then each user can be added to the groups? All are added to Users and some to Administrators?
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
This is all happening on my work laptop which we are allowed to use for personal use outside of work hours. I'm going to try to understand what is happening here. We all have domain accounts we use to log in (DOMAIN\username). We all have administrator permissions on our own computers. This means that if I log into a collegues computer with MY username and password, it works, and I get administrator access to the computer.
Jan
24
comment Why are Windows computers open to network file access by default?
Thank you for a good answer! I just have to clear some things up. I'm a hobby programmer and know quite a lot about computers in general. But I have very little experience with Windows domains because it's all just a hobby.