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Apr
23
answered How can data URLs be exploited?
Apr
13
comment Is there any technical security reason not to buy the cheapest SSL certificate you can find?
I have never heard of Comodo Dragon, but by reading their description "Comodo Dragon is a Chromium technology-based Browser that offers you all of Chrome's features PLUS the unparalleled level of security and privacy you only get from Comodo." I know that I will never use that. Whatever claims to have unparalleled-whatever security is usually crying for attention.
Apr
13
comment Is there any technical security reason not to buy the cheapest SSL certificate you can find?
@Pacerier: I would go even one step further: that most users do not even know that they can check a certificate.
Apr
13
comment Is there any technical security reason not to buy the cheapest SSL certificate you can find?
@Pacerier huh? staff like in "let's encrypt staff"? No. "Interested party"? of course I am an interested party. Interested in this FREE service and supporting with all my security guy heart such a useful FREE way for everyone to enhance their security (not because it is certificate but because this forces people to think about what they are doing and what protects them from which risk).
Apr
11
comment What is the safer Google account recovery option?
You could also use backup codes
Apr
5
answered Is knowing the salt a problem?
Apr
5
comment Is it possible to give legal value to signed web services?
I think you answered your own question: the legal framework of your country requires a human to digitally sign after having read a document. So a server cannot, on its own, take the decision to sign the document. Technically there are no particular problems with automating the process.
Mar
28
comment Is there a threshold for a password so long it doesn't get any more secure or even becomes insecure?
@LSpice: I believe that this is a case where a longer password is more dangerous. People are lured into thinking that a longer password will be more secure while this is not true - a shorter one (but more complex) would be better in that case. The extra length assumes that all of the password will be taken into account. But we may be into semantics here :)
Mar
25
revised Is there a threshold for a password so long it doesn't get any more secure or even becomes insecure?
edited body
Mar
24
comment Is there a threshold for a password so long it doesn't get any more secure or even becomes insecure?
@Mindwin: The OP says: "I am interested in the security of the password regarding cracking it only.". I presented a case where having a longer password can be dangerous due to the fact that it is longer (because it may be easier to crack)
Mar
24
answered Is there a threshold for a password so long it doesn't get any more secure or even becomes insecure?
Mar
23
comment How are private and public keys different?
Re: DKIM: I know that this is a signature, but isn't there an encryption component (when encrypting the hash - which as you mention is wrong?). <del>This is what Wikipedia claims, at least (which does not mean that it is correct, but for technical information it usually is)</del> update: the answer coming from a PhD in cryptography from ENS beats Wikipedia :)
Mar
23
comment How are private and public keys different?
"they still are very distinct things" - still, it is possible to encrypt with both of them (and decrypt with the other, at least with RSA). I was curious about the implications of using one or the other.
Mar
23
comment How are private and public keys different?
Thank you. Why there are public and private keys is clear. I was wondering about the capacity (and drawbacks) to encrypt with one or the other - which is the first sentence of your answer.
Mar
23
asked How are private and public keys different?
Mar
17
comment What are the actions of Locky on the source files which lead to encrypting?
The point is that that I do not know what "only encrypts the existing file" means. If it renames the file, then opens it for write - the encryption would fail with the right FSRM settings.
Mar
17
comment What are the actions of Locky on the source files which lead to encrypting?
@riyas: thank you, this is an informative article but it does not explain what happens with the files during the encryption in the context of the suggested mitigation
Mar
16
comment What are the actions of Locky on the source files which lead to encrypting?
The failure can also be due to the fact that the write process of the encrypted file fails (for a reason or another). As for the content of the original file - I was wondering whether it is securely deleted or something along these lines. The fact that the file is "overwritten" usually means that a new encrypted file was created, filled with (encrypted) data and the original one was deleted (which may be done in various ways)
Mar
16
answered VPN Server in router
Mar
16
comment VPN Server in router
@d1str0: I guess that the OP meant from my router to Internet (to the ISP and beyond)