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seen Jan 22 at 12:54

Jan
22
comment Idea for hiding your mobile phones' location, and still be able to place and receive calls. Any suggestions?
Basically this diagram is inspired by what companies use to be able to transfer calls to their employees while they're on the move. The customer just calls the main company number and the companies internal server takes care of the routing to the employees mobile phone. Because the routing to the mobile phone is done internally and over vpn, which can be encrypted, it has the potential to (at least partially) hide your location.
Sep
2
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@Ramhound, bit of a late reply on my part, but that is basically what I did. That way I didn't have to get a new network card for my desktop and I could apply Lucas Kauffmans solution.
Aug
11
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
Yeah, if your traffic would be monitored on a packet level, I guess there is not much you can do. But with that amount of attention you're in trouble anyways I guess. What I'm thinking of is just something that keeps your location out of easily accessible logs, like the celltower logs etc. So apart from connection issues and it not beating detailed attention, it could theoretically work?
Aug
10
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
From the answer marcel linked to I could see that an IP PBX could bridge a landline to a voip phone. So something like this bit of software would be able to bridge an incoming call on a landline to a smartphone over a wifi connection.
Aug
10
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
The fact that the connection comes from your computer is irrelevant as it still is identifiable to you. To reiterate, this is not irrelevant, but actually very important. Because the origin of the call from my computer is what obscures my actual smartphones' location. I hope I've explained my question a little more clearly, and would like to read your response.
Aug
10
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
Hi, I've explained myself a little more clearly in the comments of the other answer. I'd appreciate your take on the matter. Thanks!
Aug
10
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
It's only marginally effective as it is still your phone It is still my smartphone, that's true. But since it would not be connecting to any towers its location would not be traceable that way. The vpn connection over the open wifi network would be the only connection made by the smartphone. If your cellphone is using data It would not be connecting to a tower for data though. As I said it would be connecting to an open wifi network for that. So for all other connections it could be put in airplane mode, except for the one wifi connection.
Aug
10
comment A thought experiment about obfuscating the location of a smartphone when it is in use, is it possible?
It is still your number. That's true, however let's say that the number at home being identified as mine is something I'm fine with, I just want to obscure my actual location by routing all my calls through my home landline. Like a proxy for my phone. The fact that the connection comes from your computer is irrelevant as it still is identifiable to you. The connection is still identifiable to me, that much is true, but the call would seem to be originating from the computer at home, and not from the smartphone I have with me, so my location would be much more difficult to trace.
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
By the way, the desktop having to be on is not a problem, as I will only need the extra connection when the desktop is already occupied.
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
So the NAT would require the laptop to connect to the desktop via wifi? Because I don't have wifi on my desktop, and that would mean I would have to buy a wifi router right? Could this maybe also be done with the existing cable router I already have?
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
I would in a heartbeat, but that's the problem: I can't get another ISP because the admins of the building control the main internet access point.
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@LucasKauffman, that's true. It is illegal according to the rules of the network. However, I am not only governed by those rules, but also by my own moral standards. And according to those standards (which say that when I pay for a service, I have a right to receive that service, and some help in troubleshooting when it goes wrong), it is ok for me to do this, because I have tried to solve the problem according to the rules of the network (and they wouldn't cooperate, but they will take my money). Try to see this from both perspectives (and moral standards do matter to me).
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@LucasKauffman, Well maybe our definitions of malicious are different. In my opinion if I am doing something morally justifiable, on a network that isn't operated by morally justifiable standards, then bypassing a policy isn't malicious. It might be to the admin, but in my eyes, he is the malicious party. By your definition using TOR in Iran would be malicious, I disagree with that. I've been trying to fix this for the last year now, trying to adhere to the network policy as good as I can. After a full year of problems (and paying for nothing), I think this is justifiable.
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@LucasKauffman, so yes, I am trying to bypass a policy, but not with any evil intentions (I am after all paying for access and not getting it), and not because I am going to do something evil (all I want is normal internet access).
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@LucasKauffman, I would love to just be able to connect wirelessly with my laptop (if that were possible), believe me. It would save me a lot of time and trouble, and I wouldn't have to come up with this "solution", to a problem that shouldn't even exist in the first place.
May
9
comment How to bypass restrictive mac address filtering on home network (not malicious)
@LucasKauffman Because I am paying for access, but not getting it. They won't help me with it, so I am only trying to get access to a network that I am paying for anyway..
Apr
18
comment If I use a VPN, who will resolve my DNS requests?
Ok, that makes sense. Thanks!
Apr
18
comment If I use a VPN, who will resolve my DNS requests?
Windows Vista has an "automatic" setting, the default setting for finding a domain name server (no ip is explicitly set with this setting). If left on automatic, do you think this would mean any dns requests go to my ISP?
Apr
11
comment Is it possible to connect to a proxy with an ssl (or otherwise encrypted) connection?
Hmm.. So it works, but it's still pretty fiddly (stunnel doesn't really seem to be easy to set up). I'm surprised that there isn't an easier solution for this..
Apr
11
comment Is it possible to connect to a proxy with an ssl (or otherwise encrypted) connection?
Well i don't neccesarily want to use multiple proxies, but i don't want to send all my traffic through the proxy (just a part of it). So i want to use my regular connection for most of my traffic, and divert some through the proxy.