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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 257 votes cast
Mar
8
comment Why do major sites(Facebook, Google, etc) still send passwords unhashed?
@RobW - This is good news, thanks for the info. It seems that key derivation functions are not widely supported yet, but anyway it looks promising.
Mar
4
comment Why do major sites(Facebook, Google, etc) still send passwords unhashed?
@Eckster - There is no reason this cannot be done on optimized hardware. Wellknown password cracker tools like hashcat support brute-forcing SHA* on GPUs, not to mention dedicated NSA hardware.
Mar
4
comment Why do major sites(Facebook, Google, etc) still send passwords unhashed?
@Eckster - I doubt it, because this is a race between a relatively slow interpreted script language, and optimized hardware like GPUs or even dedicated hardware, which can do calculations parallel.
Mar
4
answered Why do major sites(Facebook, Google, etc) still send passwords unhashed?
Feb
19
comment Do most browsers handle mixed encrypted and unencrypted content correctly?
@trlkly - I think the decision to warn from mixed content is a good one. It would be very difficult for a user to know which parts are safe and which are not. Who says that a picture doesn't contain sensitive data? What other resources should be allowed unencrypted, webfonts, movies, external scripts? If an attacker can deliver an exploit inside a picture or movie, he could take over the client. A cookie can be restricted to HTTPS but do all developers know this and no one forgets to do it?
Dec
18
revised Is SSL more secure than encoding?
edited body
Dec
18
answered Is SSL more secure than encoding?
Sep
29
comment PBKDF2 used to generate an encryption key: long shared secret (password) vs iterations count
@ggo - Of course it depends on the importance of the data you want to protect, but at least you should explain it in the GUI where the administrator will enter his password. Even companies like Microsoft expect to tell them a generated token for activating their software, such a token would be a strong password.
Sep
29
comment PBKDF2 used to generate an encryption key: long shared secret (password) vs iterations count
@ggo - Well then the PBKDF is indeed the way to go, i edited my answer accordingly.
Sep
29
revised PBKDF2 used to generate an encryption key: long shared secret (password) vs iterations count
added 588 characters in body
Sep
28
revised PBKDF2 used to generate an encryption key: long shared secret (password) vs iterations count
edited body
Sep
28
answered PBKDF2 used to generate an encryption key: long shared secret (password) vs iterations count
Sep
25
revised Why don't sites implement a system where a wrong password causes a 3 second delay?
edited body
Sep
25
answered Why don't sites implement a system where a wrong password causes a 3 second delay?
Sep
19
comment What are the differences between dictionary attack and brute force attack?
Most password cracker tools offer hybrid modes, where they prefer words from a dictionary, test variations, and finally test with brute-forcing. So you cannot always distinguish between the attacks, have a look at the attack-modes of hashcat for example.
Sep
13
comment Is my custom password hashing algorithm insecure?
Another thing you gain is convenience, the password_hash() function will pack all necessary parameters into the resulting hash-value (salt / cost factor / algo). This string you can store in a single database field.
Sep
10
comment Is there a brute-force attack similar to what they demonstrate in movies
Ahh yes, i just ignored that part, you are right then.
Sep
10
comment Is there a brute-force attack similar to what they demonstrate in movies
@sq33G - Timing attacks are very unlikely, because you would measure time differences comparing the hash and not the password itself. Have a look at this question.
Sep
10
comment Is there a brute-force attack similar to what they demonstrate in movies
Assuming that the password is hashed with an appropriate algorithm, you could only measure time differences comparing the hash, not the password, so you get no useful information.
Sep
3
comment How to avoid session fixation (Login CSRF) by MitM attack without HSTS?
What you are describing is SSL-strip. The problem is, that the server cannot detect whether the page was requested by the user or by a MITM. Even if there would be something like safe cookies, the MITM could transform them to normal cookies easily.