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 Yearling
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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 19 votes cast
Jun
14
comment Is it legal to find bugs on a website and report them to the website's owner?
@StasM You should probably report it anonymously either way so you wouldn't get credit anyway (well, maybe they will add a "fixed by anon" somewhere in their changelog, but hey) :p
May
9
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@ThomasAndreèLian Not for some randomly generated salt, no.
Mar
12
awarded  Yearling
Mar
5
comment Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
The help desk is not 24/7. If this happens at night, you are screwed.
Mar
5
accepted Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
Mar
4
comment Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
As for the accounts themselves, they are not particularly valuable in and of themselves, but since you need an account to access many of the online services, a compromise could cause major disruption.
Mar
4
comment Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
No, it simply says "ERROR: The username and/or password you entered is not correct." in either case.
Mar
4
comment Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
The username is a simple first name/surname mashup, and I believe I have access to enrolment lists for the courses I'm attending, so I think I could derive at least two hundred usernames without too much difficulty. And even then it would not be infeasible to hang around the library and snoop on people's username as they log on. Not sure about an external attacker, but if the system is as fragile as I fear it is, an attacker with inside information could certainly do a lot of damage.
Mar
4
asked Account lockout with human interaction required to unlock
Feb
28
comment What's the use of making users use digits, uppercase-lowercase combination password if the passwords are hashed?
Personally when looking for raw entropy, I find hexadecimal digits easiest to remember. Lower than that and the password gets too long, and beyond that there are too many symbols to remember. I use a 20-character hexadecimal passphrase as my master passphrase (80 bits of entropy). One can easily remember up to 128 bits, but not too many of them, which is why some form of password derivation is often desired.
Jan
12
comment Passing generated keys to another process
What is your threat model?
Jan
12
comment Passing generated keys to another process
Well, as far as absolute security goes, I'd say process communication would be safest, followed by the socket method (which is really a form of IPC). But for such considerations to be made, you'd have to assume the attacker has complete access to the system, and at that point he could just read your process's memory to get the key anyhow.
Dec
28
comment Why Do we Need CAPTCHA? In what case we should use it?
Or.. you know.. cheaply pay people in third world countries to solve captchas served by proxy.
Dec
28
comment Is possible to know if increased marketshare means more viruses?
In my humble opinion: 1, perpetuated by 2. But just my intuition.
Dec
22
comment Future proof encryption possible in theory?
Check out Tahoe-LAFS, they've apparently done some work on 100-year cryptography.
Dec
21
comment If someone asks to borrow your phone to make a call, what could they do?
Bullet point #1: I have found my true calling.
Dec
19
comment Gold Standard for password hashing
I should mention it here again, the 2^61 collision attack on SHA-1 (and even the 2^80 birthday attack) is irrelevant to password hashing..
Dec
18
comment Is my developer's home-brew password security right or wrong, and why?
@jmoreno In general, security by obscurity is perceived as a crutch for poor cryptography practices, and it often is. That doesn't mean it doesn't have value - it does have its uses, but in this situation it is not warranted.
Dec
18
comment Is my developer's home-brew password security right or wrong, and why?
@jmoreno Still doesn't justify his useless scheme.
Dec
16
comment How to authenticate a salted password?
Just thought I should mention the obvious, in case somebody gets the wrong idea: a 32-bit hash is not secure.