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seen Jan 21 '13 at 14:13

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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Notable Question
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Aug
9
revised Canonicalization & Output Encoding
fixed formatting mistake + typo
Aug
9
answered Canonicalization & Output Encoding
Jun
8
comment Class.forName injection and constructor invocation
In this case, I'm the auditor/attacker, and totally agree about stacktraces being a bad idea. I am interested in concrete examples and didn't know that FileOutputStream actually created/emptied files just by being constructed, so +1 for that! Any more examples? Being able to overwrite files is pretty nasty, depending on configuration. Overwriting configuration files could e.g. enable server-side scripts to be served as plain text, and overwriting .htaccess files could also bypass restrictions.
Jun
6
revised Class.forName injection and constructor invocation
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Jun
6
comment Class.forName injection and constructor invocation
Ok, some more possibilities: parameter: java.io.FileInputStream This will throw an exception if the init-string does not exist on the filesystem, which will make it possible to determine the location of arbitrary files.
Jun
6
revised Class.forName injection and constructor invocation
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Jun
6
asked Class.forName injection and constructor invocation
Mar
27
revised Reveal the True IP of a User
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Mar
27
answered Reveal the True IP of a User
Mar
25
awarded  Teacher
Mar
24
answered Forgotten password or reset link, which is more secure to email?
Mar
24
comment What's the practical limit for rainbow-table based bruteforce?
@SteveS Agree. I'd even wager that plain text password storage is more common than any hashing more complex than MD5.
Mar
24
awarded  Supporter
Mar
24
comment What's the practical limit for rainbow-table based bruteforce?
Yes, naturally, that's why I specifically pointed out that the passwords were considered random in the context of the question.
Mar
23
comment What's the practical limit for rainbow-table based bruteforce?
What I'm interested in, basically, is what the upper bound on M+N is that can be bruteforced in practice, today, by a dedicated attacker (as per the scenarios). Perhaps the focus that I put on rainbow table was wrong.