1,200 reputation
37
bio website plokta.com
location Canterbury, United Kingdom
age 50
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

1d
comment How can I create a password that says “SALT ME!” when hashed?
@corsiKa The accepted answer brute-forced "SaltMe" or "SALTME", not the requested "SALT ME!" The difference between 6 and 8 characters is extremely significant here.
Apr
15
answered Are there “secure” languages?
Apr
4
answered Proving SSL need
Mar
22
comment Prove that you deleted the file
If you show them the file in your Recycle Bin, that's proof that you didn't delete it in any meaningful sense. When you "delete" a file by putting it in your Recycle Bin it's just moved to a different folder, not actually deleted.
Mar
3
comment How much faster would computers be if not for security?
If we're assuming people are perfect, that makes much more difference to the speed of computers than just removing security, because they're designing perfect CPUs and writing perfect code.
Mar
3
comment How much faster would computers be if not for security?
You would still need things like file permissions and separate user accounts to prevent people from doing stuff by mistake instead of deliberately, like accidentally deleting someone else's files by mis-typing a command. So it wouldn't make much difference.
Feb
23
answered What is the correct way to make a password salt?
Feb
2
answered What are some good ways to prevent a malicious visitor from maxing out our customer's API maximum allowed service calls?
Jan
2
awarded  Yearling
Jan
2
awarded  Yearling
Dec
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
22
comment Which Wifi encryption method is secure?
You don't have to use wifi, you can buy a Thunderbolt to Ethernet adaptor.
Dec
21
answered If someone asks to borrow your phone to make a call, what could they do?
Dec
3
answered Securely publishing GPG keys
Nov
24
answered How valuable is secrecy of an algorithm?
Aug
29
answered Is it a weakness to be able to see server side scripting?
Jul
5
comment Long Passwords: How are they more secure?
And for 16 characters, it's two and a half million years, using your own assumption of a times 36 increase in difficulty with an extra character. In practice, of course, that means it lasts until better hardware comes along, but well-chosen passwords of 16 characters or more are still effectively uncrackable.
Jul
5
answered Long Passwords: How are they more secure?
Jun
28
comment Purpose and Uses of Root SSL Certificates
Your secure delivery could be done in lots of ways -- only you know your own circumstances and user base. Post out USB keys. Get your users to bring their laptops into your office. Set up a VPN connection and transfer them over http (but don't do it over http without authenticating the server).
Jun
28
answered Purpose and Uses of Root SSL Certificates