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bio website security.stackexchange.com
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I'm not the droid you're looking for.


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reviewed Close Schemas, CSS, Attribute files in DOS not showing in Windows----HUSBANDS NETWORK
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comment Schemas, CSS, Attribute files in DOS not showing in Windows----HUSBANDS NETWORK
If he has a local admin account on your system, or regular unrestricted/unsupervised physical access to it, you're pretty much out of luck. Even without that, if he has administrative control over the home network, there's still a lot that you can't do too much about. Sounds like the root of the problem would be some trust issues in your relation which are far out of scope for this site.
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reviewed Close Beginner Pen Testing (Do I need to get a refurbished PC)?
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reviewed Close Preempting a Mobile Security Audit
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reviewed Close Which Application is best for Data Encryption + Cloud (OneDrive + Google Drive) Encryption
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reviewed Close How to create a tunnel between me and a remote server with nc or ssh?
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reviewed Leave Open Detecting port scans in OSX kernel
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reviewed Close Best and most current sites for security breaches
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reviewed Close How do the internals of a Windows update security patch work?
Sep
11
reviewed Close Self-signed certs /keys stopped working with Thunderbird upgrade
Sep
11
reviewed Close Utility to hide several encrypted messages in single file
Sep
11
comment Vulnerability exploitation in Java
As it is "how are exploits done in Java" is very broad. I'd suggest closing if it's staying as is. If the scope were to be narrowed to "how can I identify X-type exploits in Java", it might be more appropriate for the StackExchange format. I suggest expanding just a bit on your C programming experience, then asking about comparable methods in Java (e.g.: "In C, I'd look for buffer overflows or ROP based exploits like this... how do I do the same thing in Java?"), and completely nuking the last sentence - perhaps even nuke everything starting with "Is it even possible".
Sep
11
reviewed Close Outgoing Email Security
Sep
11
comment Mac OSX: What is the safest way to access an unknown USB storage?
@MatthewPeters Solution there, as I'm inferring the OP is trying to do (since they said "I HAVE to access it") is to hook it up in a safe environment and pull essential data off. Then, validate the data and environment are still not compromised by malware before extracting the data to a trusted environment.
Sep
11
comment Mac OSX: What is the safest way to access an unknown USB storage?
Clarification: In the earlier comment, I said "USB device" or "USB drive" where this question seems to be about SD cards. Same statements still apply, though.
Sep
11
comment Mac OSX: What is the safest way to access an unknown USB storage?
@MatthewPeters I have plenty of friends who might give me SD cards or USB devices which I do not trust. That has nothing to do with our friendship, and everything to do with their competency (or really, lack thereof) in maintaining secure systems.
Sep
11
comment Mac OSX: What is the safest way to access an unknown USB storage?
@MatthewPeters As noted in comments on your answer, a write blocker (or even mounting as read-only) is to protect the evidence (in this case, the SD card which may contain malware) not you. Additionally, protection of the evidence does not appear to be a major concern here - Honey Badger obviously just has some data they need to get off the drive without getting infected. To be properly protected, a LiveCD or VM should be used instead.
Sep
11
comment Mac OSX: What is the safest way to access an unknown USB storage?
I'm not following how a write blocker can "prevent a device from writing to you". The threat is not that malware resident on a USB device will "magically" write itself into the host system. The threat is that the host system will read the malware from the USB device and then write it to itself. Really, for the sole purpose of protecting oneself from a malware infection, a write blocker is excessive. The write blocker is there to keep your system from altering the contents of the USB drive. The risk here is that the system might be tricked by the USB drive's contents into writing to itself.
Sep
10
comment Contactless session on ATM?
@TildalWave Solution to the "can't eat card" concern: Each card has a different identifier/cert (even multiple cards on the same account should be different) which gets revoked server-side in the case of lost/stolen/locked. This is even more secure than eating the card, since it can be done without actually needing to have the card at an ATM and is also effective globally against any clones.
Sep
10
reviewed Close How do I force Firefox or any other browser to check for CRLs