15,209 reputation
1159124
bio website security.stackexchange.com
location Florida
age 33
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

This is a canary message, to be removed in the case of my death. If you're reading this, I haven't died yet.

Then again, how would you know? I mean, how could I possibly delete this message after my own demise?

You know what? Just go ahead and assume I'm dead. Any posts appearing to be made by me are from an impostor who's stolen my identity post-mortem, and only further prove the fact that I am dead. After all, why would I even think to post a canary message if I was expecting to be alive to remove it anyway?

In any case, I'm still not the droid you're looking for.


Jul
30
comment Can data be tampered with after expert clones a drive?
At this point, the person under investigation has zero assurance (and no means to assure) that the data has not been manipulated since they were not provided the hashes. However, a court of justice will more than likely accept the testimony of a sworn civil servant who says the hashes provided for evidence were the same that were calculated at the time the drives were initially collected. What legal recourse there is, to address the fact that nobody (without an eidetic memory, and without bias favoring investigators) can corroborate this, will probably depend on your jurisdiction.
Jul
22
comment How secure is socks5 proxy over ssh?
Unless your boss is at the C-level (or equivalent in your company) over IT Security, how does having their permission make a difference?
Jul
21
comment Mobile Phone security - help finding security/privacy review/discussion
@user3578951 Actually, it's more of an SE thing than a "you're a phone/security newbie" thing. You should check out the Help Center and peruse the site a bit before asking your next question, to get a better idea of the Q&A format and quality expectations.
Jul
21
comment Mobile Phone security - help finding security/privacy review/discussion
@user3578951 You're definitely welcome to peruse the existing questions here, and to ask about any specific aspects of phone security that you don't understand. But we don't do open-ended lists (e.g.: references to sites/articles) that will likely change in value and validity over time, nor could we possibly cover the entire topic for you without posting a full book.
Jul
21
comment Mobile Phone security - help finding security/privacy review/discussion
My gut reaction (and what I ended up clicking) was "opinion-based" too. But really the most appropriate close reason for this is "shopping recommendation". In the past, we also might have flagged it as "too localized". Other elements of your question push it towards "too broad" as well. Overall, it's just really not a good fit for the StackExchange format.
Jul
21
comment Is (safe) encryption over compromised line impossible?
@Mark See above.
Jul
21
comment Is (safe) encryption over compromised line impossible?
@danielAzuelos I doubt the entire industry is going to change the name of a long-standing cryptographic standard, solely for the sake of historical accuracy. And making special notation about that history in an answer here, where such history is irrelevant to the question at hand, is really pretty pointless. A more appropriate place to raise such concern would be on the linked Wikipedia article. However, it seems there's no point in that either since the second paragraph already addresses it.
Jul
21
comment Is (safe) encryption over compromised line impossible?
+1 to Ethan. @MikeOunsworth The asker is very clear about Eve's (or C's) MO here. They're only logging the communication for later analysis - not actively interfering. As such, public key cryptography fully satisfies the threat model here. If Eve was modifying traffic in real-time, then you'd have to worry more about authenticity. Public key cryptography still serves this, but there needs to be a certain amount of data exchanged securely in advance. (Either the public keys themselves, or the public key of a trusted signing authority.)
Jul
20
comment
@ThomasPornin There ya go and just ruin it for the rest of us, eh? Bear endorsement is pretty much like physical access - trumps all resistance.
Jul
20
comment
Note: There's at least two other candidates in the U.S. Eastern time zone. Not sure I'd consider that a real selling point.
Jul
20
comment NMap for getting machines connected to a network switch
That really depends on what data you're looking to gather. You don't need nmap to do a ping sweep and look at your arp table.
Jul
15
comment How to determine what type of hash algorithm is used
@PrajneyaKumar If you need guidance on how to find (or how it's nigh-impossible to find) out what encryption/encoding/hashing algorithm was used to generate your string, see the linked duplicate. If you're wanting someone to break the hash or decrypt/decode the string for you, you're barking up the wrong tree.
Jul
13
comment How can I detect subnets?
@user1786193 Technically that's a WAN, but most people assume you're referring to LAN as the inside network and WAN as the Internet - so, with that usage, your network would be the LAN. (I might call it a MAN, but 100km seems a bit big for that.)
Jul
10
comment Password rules: Should I disallow “leetspeak” dictionary passwords like XKCD's Tr0ub4dor&3
Wow. Compared to NIST, they're mostly pretty lax. 8 characters vs. 12. 90-day expiration vs. 60. Password history of 10 vs. 24. Only things that beef it up are the bits about no dictionary words or proper names, and not being the same as the user ID.
Jul
10
comment Password rules: Should I disallow “leetspeak” dictionary passwords like XKCD's Tr0ub4dor&3
The OP mentioned they're working on a government site. If it's for the U.S. government, they'll have to follow NIST guidelines which require 12-character minimums - 7 won't do at all.
Jul
9
comment Is there a way to block your ISP from controlling the password of your main router?
Changing the password is no good here. I've had ISPs remotely change router settings while I was on a support call, despite me having changed the password and explicitly objecting to the changes while on the call. They have a habit of pushing firmware updates and forcing reboots at-will with zero notice, too.
Jul
9
comment Is there a way to block your ISP from controlling the password of your main router?
@JeffMeden Instead of using the "DMZ Host", ask the ISP about how to set up "bridge mode". That disables WiFi, disables all but one LAN port, and effectively makes the gateway device behave as if it was just a modem.
Jul
9
comment Is there a way to block your ISP from controlling the password of your main router?
You can furnish your own gateway device, but I've heard (unconfirmed) they require a backdoor even into those. I usually just put my own router behind theirs, just as if theirs was a "dummy modem" - they can control theirs all they want, but they won't be able to get into mine.
Jul
8
comment Windows Credentials - read password
Unless the system drive itself is encrypted, there's a number of boot disks that will allow you to change local account passwords for a Windows system. This would have to be done locally on the target system, not on an RDP client.
Jul
8
comment Windows Credentials - read password
Not a bad question for pentest purposes. But for general "forgot password" purposes, you are probably better off just contacting the System Administrator for a reset or resetting it yourself locally with a boot disk.