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bio website kylheku.com
location Vancouver, Canada
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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
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1d
comment What makes it illegal to use the information learned by exploiting a bug?
Gee, what makes it wrong to enter someone's house if their lock is broken?
Apr
14
comment Are there “secure” languages?
C is younger than some secure languages.
Apr
1
comment Is Google overreaching by forcing me to use TLS?
How is this question different from, say, Slashdot is forcing me to use TCP/IP and HTTP to talk to them. Or this amber-screened WYSE terminal is forcing me to use an RS-232 cable to hook up to the computer. Or this fast-food worker insists on taking orders only in English. (I'm not being sarcastic; someone point it out to me. Is it because it involves a security mechanism?)
Jan
31
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
21
revised Are passwords stored in memory safe?
Typo.
Nov
28
comment What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
@Thomas then it boils down to who has the superior poker face, basically.
Nov
28
comment What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
@Scorpion No idea. It's probably illegal for the authorities to install one without a warrant. Is it illegal to use in a civil matter? Shrug ... IANAL.
Nov
28
revised What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
added 239 characters in body
Nov
28
answered What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
Nov
14
comment Why are we still using HTTP?
The thing is, maybe the privacy of what someone is looking at on various sites is important to some people. For instance, what you're googling for, etc. The problem with HTTPS is that it's not a complete privacy solution. It still reveals what server you're connecting to, and from what IP address.
Oct
20
comment Isn't all security “through obscurity”?
Whether or not there is an obscurity element is subjective. If you use a AES with a 256 bit key, the situation acquires a security through obscurity element if you choose to believe that you are getting extra protection, above that furnished by your 256 bit key, from the fact that your attacker does not know that you are using AES. The slogan security through obscurity is basically a way of expressing criticism of such a belief.
Sep
13
revised Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
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Sep
12
revised Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
added 1267 characters in body
Sep
12
comment Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
@RoryAlsop The same threat exists from a legitimate site. Assume that every site stores passwords in the clear, and is staffed by people some of whom harvest cleartext passwords.
Sep
12
comment Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
@PaddyLandau If the hashes are stolen, then the password is quite moot. The site whose hashes are stolen is "pwned", and that extends down to your account. You now have a problem related to that password only if the password itself stores some personal info, or if you re-used the password for other sites.
Sep
11
comment Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
@PaddyLandau Why would the account be locked, if the intruders have access to the hashed password database? They are not sitting there guessing passwords until accounts get locked; they are cracking hashes.
Sep
10
comment Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
The problem is that more and more sites that nobody cares about are insisting on the deadbolt. Your online banking site should not require a particularly strong password. Why? Because a strong password is only needed to to protect the password itself, in case of a breakin. A breakin is something that must not happen to your online banking. If the bank is cracked, I couldn't care less whether they have my hashed password and attack it; no other site has that password. The attackers might not even need to crack that password in order to mess with the bank accounts.
Sep
10
revised Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
added 914 characters in body
Sep
10
answered Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
Sep
10
comment Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?
Not if the account is locked after a bunch of tries, and the owner of the account has to verify it externally to unlock it.