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So you're running port 443 on a web server using plain HTTP (no TLS/SSL)?

Best practise is to close any ports that are not being used.

It depends on where the web root for port 443 is configured to look on your server. If this is the same location as your normal website then this could be a risk if there are certain items that need to be secured via configuration that is missing on this second webroot's setup.

If it is configured to look elsewhere, then files could be unintentionally exposed.

It is not a security risk to your users because they will not see https:// or the padlock in the browser address bar. They would simply see http://example.com:443:/ which gives the same security as port 80 would (http://example.com/).

So you're running port 443 on a web server using plain HTTP (no TLS/SSL)?

Best practise is to close any ports that are not being used.

It depends on where the web root for port 443 is configured to look on your server. If this is the same location as your normal website then this could be a risk if there are certain items that need to be secured via configuration that is missing on this second webroot's setup.

If it is configured to look elsewhere, then files could be unintentionally exposed.

It is not a security risk to your users because they will not see https:// or the padlock in the browser address bar. They would simply see http://example.com:443:/ which gives the same security as port 80 would (http://example.com/).

So you're running port 443 on a web server using plain HTTP (no TLS/SSL)?

Best practise is to close any ports that are not being used.

It depends on where the web root for port 443 is configured to look on your server. If this is the same location as your normal website then this could be a risk if there are certain items that need to be secured via configuration that is missing on this second webroot's setup.

If it is configured to look elsewhere, then files could be unintentionally exposed.

It is not a security risk to your users because they will not see https:// or the padlock in the browser address bar. They would simply see http://example.com:443/ which gives the same security as port 80 would (http://example.com/).

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source | link

So you're running port 443 on a web server using plain HTTP (no TLS/SSL)?

Best practise is to close any ports that are not being used.

It depends on where the web root for port 443 is configured to look on your server. If this is the same location as your normal website then this could be a risk if there are certain items that need to be secured via configuration that is missing on this second webroot's setup.

If it is configured to look elsewhere, then files could be unintentionally exposed.

It is not a security risk to your users because they will not see https:// or the padlock in the browser address bar. They would simply see http://example.com:443:/ which gives the same security as port 80 would (http://example.com/).