Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
2 fix incorrect versions
source | link

Without knowing the internal workings on the patch I can only guess, but...

Both IE and IIS support versions of TLS that are not vulnerable to BEAST, e.g. TLS v21.1 and v31.2, but these versions are not on by default. Also, it's dependent on the cipher suite used in the connection for v11.0. The patch could do a number of things like turn the versions on by default, or disable the particular cipher suite that is vulnerable to BEAST.

Without knowing the internal workings on the patch I can only guess, but...

Both IE and IIS support versions of TLS that are not vulnerable to BEAST, e.g. TLS v2 and v3, but these versions are not on by default. Also, it's dependent on the cipher suite used in the connection for v1. The patch could do a number of things like turn the versions on by default, or disable the particular cipher suite that is vulnerable to BEAST.

Without knowing the internal workings on the patch I can only guess, but...

Both IE and IIS support versions of TLS that are not vulnerable to BEAST, e.g. TLS 1.1 and 1.2, but these versions are not on by default. Also, it's dependent on the cipher suite used in the connection for 1.0. The patch could do a number of things like turn the versions on by default, or disable the particular cipher suite that is vulnerable to BEAST.

1
source | link

Without knowing the internal workings on the patch I can only guess, but...

Both IE and IIS support versions of TLS that are not vulnerable to BEAST, e.g. TLS v2 and v3, but these versions are not on by default. Also, it's dependent on the cipher suite used in the connection for v1. The patch could do a number of things like turn the versions on by default, or disable the particular cipher suite that is vulnerable to BEAST.