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If I understood correctly, the Onion Router (TOR)Tor network works that way:

Alice writes a letter to Dave and encrypts it three times: first with Dave's key, then adds Dave's address, encrypts the package with CraigsCraig's key, add'sadds Craig's address and encrypts the package with Bob's key.

She then sends the letter to Bob, who decrypts it, and finds Craig's address, and forwards it to him.

Craig decrypts it, finds Dave's address, and forwards it to him. Dave decrypts it and finds that the letter is for him

In a perfect world, no one except Alice and Dave could now tell that Dave is indeed the recipient of that letter, because it COULD BE that he had found Emily's address inside the envelope and forwarded it.

A second application would be that you encrypt a message with both your private key and the recipient's public key. The recipient decrypts the message with your public key and his private key, and can thus obtain the information that the message is from you and for him. But usually, a HMAC is used to make sure the message is indeed from a certain sender and has not been tampered with.

If I understood correctly, the Onion Router (TOR) network works that way:

Alice writes a letter to Dave and encrypts it three times: first with Dave's key, then adds Dave's address, encrypts the package with Craigs key, add's Craig's address and encrypts the package with Bob's key.

She then sends the letter to Bob, who decrypts it, and finds Craig's address, and forwards it to him.

Craig decrypts it, finds Dave's address, and forwards it to him. Dave decrypts it and finds that the letter is for him

In a perfect world, no one except Alice and Dave could now tell that Dave is indeed the recipient of that letter, because it COULD BE that he had found Emily's address inside the envelope and forwarded it.

A second application would be that you encrypt a message with both your private key and the recipient's public key. The recipient decrypts the message with your public key and his private key, and can thus obtain the information that the message is from you and for him. But usually, a HMAC is used to make sure the message is indeed from a certain sender and has not been tampered with.

If I understood correctly, the Tor network works that way:

Alice writes a letter to Dave and encrypts it three times: first with Dave's key, then adds Dave's address, encrypts the package with Craig's key, adds Craig's address and encrypts the package with Bob's key.

She then sends the letter to Bob, who decrypts it, and finds Craig's address, and forwards it to him.

Craig decrypts it, finds Dave's address, and forwards it to him. Dave decrypts it and finds that the letter is for him

In a perfect world, no one except Alice and Dave could now tell that Dave is indeed the recipient of that letter, because it COULD BE that he had found Emily's address inside the envelope and forwarded it.

A second application would be that you encrypt a message with both your private key and the recipient's public key. The recipient decrypts the message with your public key and his private key, and can thus obtain the information that the message is from you and for him. But usually, a HMAC is used to make sure the message is indeed from a certain sender and has not been tampered with.

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source | link

If I understood correctly, the Onion Router (TOR) network works that way:

Alice writes a letter to Dave and encrypts it three times: first with Dave's key, then adds Dave's address, encrypts the package with Craigs key, add's Craig's address and encrypts the package with Bob's key.

She then sends the letter to Bob, who decrypts it, and finds Craig's address, and forwards it to him.

Craig decrypts it, finds Dave's address, and forwards it to him. Dave decrypts it and finds that the letter is for him

In a perfect world, no one except Alice and Dave could now tell that Dave is indeed the recipient of that letter, because it COULD BE that he had found Emily's address inside the envelope and forwarded it.

A second application would be that you encrypt a message with both your private key and the recipient's public key. The recipient decrypts the message with your public key and his private key, and can thus obtain the information that the message is from you and for him. But usually, a HMAC is used to make sure the message is indeed from a certain sender and has not been tampered with.