3 Striked wrong information
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(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it? Sorry for the misleading answer / wrong information.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's notresponse packets actually are encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP and this is broadcast, so why would you even want to encryptactually how it? helps with the generation of IVs.

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it?

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it? Sorry for the misleading answer / wrong information.

(2) ARP response packets actually are encrypted and this is actually how it helps with the generation of IVs.

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

2 Fixed aircrack-ng link to ARP Request Replay Attack
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(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it?

How ARP Request Replay AttackARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it?

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it?

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.

1
source | link

(1) You are correct, if you have traffic on the AP you're sniffing you can get enough IV just beeing passive, there's no need to inject ARP request to generate new IV to crack WEP.

(2) The encryption is done at the network layer, ARP is on the data-link layer, so no, it's not encrypted, as stated in it's definition RFC826 ARP is broadcast, so why would you even want to encrypt it?

How ARP Request Replay Attack works:

The classic ARP request replay attack is the most effective way to generate new initialization vectors (IVs), and works very reliably. The program listens for an ARP packet then retransmits it back to the access point. This, in turn, causes the access point to repeat the ARP packet with a new IV. The program retransmits the same ARP packet over and over. However, each ARP packet repeated by the access point has a new IVs. It is all these new IVs which allow you to determine the WEP key.

So basically you just listen for ARP and then retransmits it so generate more IVS enought to crack WEP.