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General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Wallpaper by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Wallpaper by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

5 added 116 characters in body
source | link

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Background pictureWallpaper by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Background picture by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Wallpaper by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

4 added 116 characters in body
source | link

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Background picture by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

TOR

Tor is awesome but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

General

Make sure obfuscating and encrypting your internet traffic isn't illegal where you live.

HTTPS

This is not a solution. Not only because you will have to access websites which aren't secured via SSL but also because your landlord can still see which servers you're connecting to even when HTTPS is used.

Your landlord probably won't take a look at the contents of your internet traffic anyways but will merely look at what servers you connect to. HTTPS doesn't protect you from them doing this. Your landlord can still see which servers you connect to.

TOR

Tor is awesome and your landlord will have no idea which servers you connetc to but there are many websites for which you have to solve captchas all the time if you access them via TOR. This can get annoying, soon. Furthermore, your email provider may prevent you from accessing your emails via TOR.

VPN

This is the solution you're looking for.

Many routers provide tunneling connections to the internet through VPN. You can sign up for a VPN service, some of which don't require you to state personal details and even letting you pay for example in bitcoin. This will typically cost a few euros per month.

Setting this up on your router is the best solution because this makes sure your landlord cannot see the contents of your data transfers. However, they can still see that they're happening, when they're happening, and how much data is transferred. But the cannot read the contents and they cannot figure out which servers you're talking to. From their perspective, you'll always be talking to the VPN service provider.

If your router doesn't support VPN, maybe buy a new one. I got one for 40 € which supports tunneling all traffic through VPN. I got another one for 250 € which doesn't support that.

If your router doesn't support it and you don't want to buy a new one, check for alternative firmware for it.

If even that's not possible, you should use VPN on your computer and your phone. Note that this has to be done for every device of which you intend to obfuscate the internet traffic of and you have to set up VPN again if you reinstall the operating system or install a different one, whereas setting VPN up on your router obfuscates the internet traffic of all your devices so there's less to be done wrong.

Setting VPN up should be very easy on most desktop operating systems. The necessary software is already installed on most Linux distros.

(Background picture by Tiziano Consonni, License: CC-BY-SA-2.0)

If OpenVPN is used, just do a quick

sudo apt-get install openvpn

VPN is used by people to access the servers at their workplaces to it's probably very easy to set up for Windows and OSX, too. It can be used on Android but you probably have to install an app to do so.

3 added 103 characters in body
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2 added 103 characters in body
source | link
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