2 Cleaned it up and adding some formatting
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ThereThese are few waysfew ways (not comprehensive) to proveprove that your application is encrypting informationencrypting information:

  1. SSL Labs has a web application to test your web application's SSL implementation
  2. In your web browser, sites secured with HTTPS will show a green lock next to the URL like so: a picture that shows the green lock icon next to the URL for google.ca SSL implementation

OR

  1. In your web browser, sites secured with HTTPS will show a green lock next to the URL like so: a picture that shows the green lock icon next to the URL for google.ca

If you need more details, or better proof that your certificate is working other than the green lock, click that lock, show details, and you'll see something like this (in Chrome for this example):   

details that describe the certificate is encrypting your connection and working properly

This will give you all the dirty little details you need to verify that your certificate is working as expected.

OR

  1. Fire up WiresharkWireshark, or a packet sniffer/analyzer of your choice, then run some datarun some data through your application that should be encrypted should be encrypted (login, submit a form etc...). Find the packetpacket, follow the TCP streamTCP stream, and check to ensure nothing is transmitted in plain-textplain-text.

There are few ways (not comprehensive) to prove that your application is encrypting information:

  1. SSL Labs has a web application to test your web application's SSL implementation
  2. In your web browser, sites secured with HTTPS will show a green lock next to the URL like so: a picture that shows the green lock icon next to the URL for google.ca

If you need better proof than the green lock, click that lock, show details, and you'll see something like this (in Chrome for this example):  details that describe the certificate is encrypting your connection and working properly

  1. Fire up Wireshark, or a packet sniffer/analyzer of your choice, then run some data through your application that should be encrypted (login, submit a form etc...). Find the packet, follow the TCP stream, and check to ensure nothing is transmitted in plain-text.

These are few ways (not comprehensive) to prove that your application is encrypting information:

  1. SSL Labs has a web application to test your web application's SSL implementation

OR

  1. In your web browser, sites secured with HTTPS will show a green lock next to the URL like so: a picture that shows the green lock icon next to the URL for google.ca

If you need more details, or better proof that your certificate is working other than the green lock, click that lock, show details, and you'll see something like this (in Chrome for this example): 

details that describe the certificate is encrypting your connection and working properly

This will give you all the dirty little details you need to verify that your certificate is working as expected.

OR

  1. Fire up Wireshark, or a packet sniffer/analyzer of your choice, then run some data through your application that should be encrypted (login, submit a form etc...). Find the packet, follow the TCP stream, and check to ensure nothing is transmitted in plain-text.
1
source | link

There are few ways (not comprehensive) to prove that your application is encrypting information:

  1. SSL Labs has a web application to test your web application's SSL implementation
  2. In your web browser, sites secured with HTTPS will show a green lock next to the URL like so: a picture that shows the green lock icon next to the URL for google.ca

If you need better proof than the green lock, click that lock, show details, and you'll see something like this (in Chrome for this example): details that describe the certificate is encrypting your connection and working properly

  1. Fire up Wireshark, or a packet sniffer/analyzer of your choice, then run some data through your application that should be encrypted (login, submit a form etc...). Find the packet, follow the TCP stream, and check to ensure nothing is transmitted in plain-text.