5 replaced http://serverfault.com/ with https://serverfault.com/
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Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

4 replaced http://security.stackexchange.com/ with https://security.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

3 Changed wording for clarity, none to no one
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Even for the good causeRegardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is more than likely to be considered illegal in your country. And none

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, butexcept in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before doingacting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Even for the good cause breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is more than likely to be considered illegal in your country. And none is obliged to be audited without consent, but in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would therefore strongly advise not going that route. However, why not asking admins before doing, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

Regardless of your intentions, breaking is breaking, as long as it is deliberate. In other words, it is likely considered illegal in your country.

And no one is obliged to be audited without consent, except in cases and by actors defined by law, so the intent doesn't matter here.

What if, for example, your SQL injection has some side effects you didn't expect and damages the audited system? Or, what if your SQL injection fails (which is good) but triggers some legal action against you, as it is spotted by the admin in the website's log file?

I would, therefore, strongly advise not going that route. However, why not try asking admins before acting, explaining exactly what you explained in this post? Most will say no, but a few might say yes.

More about this:

2 added 66 characters in body
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1
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