5 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browserDetect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS connection. But otherwise, your mobile operator is free to add or not add any of the HTTP x-headers, based on the browser you are using, page you are visiting, your contract (or lack of) with that operator, and any other info they may find relevant. Often, the operators only pass these headers for their own 'mobile portal'.

None of these headers should be trusted by the backend, they all can be easily spoofed.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that external web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS connection. But otherwise, your mobile operator is free to add or not add any of the HTTP x-headers, based on the browser you are using, page you are visiting, your contract (or lack of) with that operator, and any other info they may find relevant. Often, the operators only pass these headers for their own 'mobile portal'.

None of these headers should be trusted by the backend, they all can be easily spoofed.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that external web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS connection. But otherwise, your mobile operator is free to add or not add any of the HTTP x-headers, based on the browser you are using, page you are visiting, your contract (or lack of) with that operator, and any other info they may find relevant. Often, the operators only pass these headers for their own 'mobile portal'.

None of these headers should be trusted by the backend, they all can be easily spoofed.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that external web sites receive from your phone.

4 added 154 characters in body
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Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS:// connection. But otherwise, your mobile operator is free to add or not add any of the HTTP x-headers, based on the browser you are using, page you are visiting, your contract (or lack of) with that operator, and any other info they may find relevant. Often, the operators only pass these headers for their own 'mobile portal'.

None of these headers should be trusted by the backend, they all can be easily spoofed.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that external web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS:// connection.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS connection. But otherwise, your mobile operator is free to add or not add any of the HTTP x-headers, based on the browser you are using, page you are visiting, your contract (or lack of) with that operator, and any other info they may find relevant. Often, the operators only pass these headers for their own 'mobile portal'.

None of these headers should be trusted by the backend, they all can be easily spoofed.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that external web sites receive from your phone.

3 added 154 characters in body
source | link

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS:// connection.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that web sites receive from your phone.

Extended HTTP headers are propagated by your mobile operator, at their discretion, as described in Detect an MSISDN (mobile number) with the browser.

They won't work when you are on Wi-Fi, or if you are browsing on a secure HTTPS:// connection.

A long list of such headers, caught in the wild, may be found here: https://mobiforge.com/design-development/useful-x-headers.

You can use a simple service at http://www.mulliner.org/pc.cgi that shows you all information that web sites receive from your phone.

2 added 154 characters in body
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