7 mention 2FA
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Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they likely have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager, enable Two Factor Authentication for accounts that are valuable to you and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they likely have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they likely have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager, enable Two Factor Authentication for accounts that are valuable to you and don't worry about things you can't control.

6 added 400 characters in body
source | link

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they likely have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they likely have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

5 added 400 characters in body
source | link

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, and don't worry about things you can't control.

Plaintext passwords is not your (=user) problem

You should consider password a shared secret - i.e. assume that both you and WD know it. After all, every time you log in to their site, you say "Hi, my name is Douglas Gaskell and my password is Correct Horse Battery Staple, please let me in". If bad guys hack their site, they don't need your password - they have access to your data anyway. Ashley Madison did hash users' passwords, but that wasn't much consolation after data breach.

Site owners should not store plaintext passwords because of dangers of password reuse - but you shouldn't be reusing your passwords in the first place. Pick strong, unique passwords for each site. That way, passwords stored in plaintext isn't really your problem. If you did reuse your WD password on other sites, change it on WD and every other site, if possible.

Don't waste your time

Users can't control whether their passwords are hashed or not. Big companies either have reasons for storing passwords in recoverable form (which does not necessarily imply plaintext), or pretend to have one or just simply don't care. Their password system is possibly used by multiple services, some of them may be awfully legacy mainframes. You are unlikely to change their password policy.

By the way

Storing password in recoverable form does not imply storing it in plaintext. It may be encrypted.

TL;DR: Use strong passwords, don't reuse them, keep them in good password manager and don't worry about things you can't control.

4 Add second paragraph.
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3 added 8 characters in body
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2 Terrible typo
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1
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