Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
2 corrected formatting and grammar
source | link

You are right. There are two things here- 1) Credentials in URL 2)Caching in the browser:

  1. Credentials in URL
  2. Caching in the browser

Credentials should not neverever be exposed in URL. The URL’sURLs are logged in a lot of places, for eg :example proxy server, firewalls, etc. I would be excited to steal that information if I’mI was the firewall administrator or something along those lines. Now Now on to their point that the attacker would need access to the browser. Well how about if the user is using a public computer? Would they still say it’s insignificant.? If they do, man, you need stop using their services.  

You are right. There are two things here- 1) Credentials in URL 2)Caching in the browser

Credentials should not never be exposed in URL. The URL’s are logged in a lot of places for eg : proxy server, firewalls etc. I would be excited to steal that information if I’m the firewall administrator or something along those lines. Now to their point that the attacker would need access to the browser. Well how about if the user is using a public computer? Would they still say it’s insignificant. If they do, man you need stop using their services.  

You are right. There are two things here:

  1. Credentials in URL
  2. Caching in the browser

Credentials should not ever be exposed in URL. The URLs are logged in a lot of places, for example proxy server, firewalls, etc. I would be excited to steal that information if I was the firewall administrator or something along those lines. Now on to their point that the attacker would need access to the browser. Well how about if the user is using a public computer? Would they still say it’s insignificant? If they do, man, you need stop using their services.

1
source | link

You are right. There are two things here- 1) Credentials in URL 2)Caching in the browser

Credentials should not never be exposed in URL. The URL’s are logged in a lot of places for eg : proxy server, firewalls etc. I would be excited to steal that information if I’m the firewall administrator or something along those lines. Now to their point that the attacker would need access to the browser. Well how about if the user is using a public computer? Would they still say it’s insignificant. If they do, man you need stop using their services.