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3 ip6tables
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From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6ip6tables was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 and [::]:[port] (every interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6 was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 and [::]:[port] (every interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, ip6tables was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 and [::]:[port] (every interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

2 added 17 characters in body
source | link

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6 was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 and [::]:[port] (everevery interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6 was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 (ever interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6 was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 and [::]:[port] (every interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.

1
source | link

From a firewall perspective it is important to realize that both IPv4 and IPv6 (if enabled) are configured on a system and this is not always the case.

In my experience, I have been able to bypass (internal) firewalls. In one scenario, on a Linux machine, iptables was configured however, iptables6 was not, which exposed (vulnerable) services that were not available over IPv4.

Since most services bind to 0.0.0.0 (ever interface), these services are also available over IPv6.

So, yes it is important to consider disabling IPv6 if you do not use it. If you do use it, you or administrators in general should be made aware that (at least on Linux servers) extra firewall configuration is required.

And before you start that administrators should be aware of this, you are totally correct. However, from experience there is lacking a lot of IPv6 knowledge among system administrators.