7 added 21 characters in body
source | link

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/")
def app_proxy():
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8008/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8008/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/")
def app_proxy():
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8008/?sqli=value

6 edited body
source | link

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8080/?sqli=valuehttp://127.0.0.1:8008/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8080/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8008/?sqli=value

5 deleted 4 characters in body
source | link

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should not be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8080/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should not be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8080/?sqli=value

Tools are seldom written generic enough to handle obscure test-cases. It might be tempting to blame the tool for its shortcomings, but more often the problem is obscure/non-generic, and should be solved by other means.

You can solve this problem by creating a small webapp that acts as a proxy between the target application and your tool.

The tool accept the vulnerable input as a parameter, and forward it to the application as required.

Here is an untested python/flask code to illustrate how this can be done:

from flask import Flask, request
import requests

i = 0

app = Flask(__name__)
@app.route("/"):
        sqli = request.args.get("sqli",None)
        data = {"somekey":"someval","vulnerableparam":sqli}
        resp = requests.post("http://target.com/login?%s-%s.FormSubmit"%(i,i+1),data=data)
        i += 1
        return resp.text, resp.status_code

app.run(host="127.0.0.1",port=8008)

After you have started the flask-app, you should be able to use sqlmap against http://127.0.0.1:8080/?sqli=value

4 added 3 characters in body
source | link
3 added 35 characters in body
source | link
2 added 229 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link