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I would recommend downloading a live Linux distribution (Ubuntu is great for this), create a bootable USB device on a clean computer, and booting your infected computer with this USB drive.

With Linux running, you can copy all pictures to another USB drive, without any Windows malware interfering.

Virus attaching themselves to PNG files are very unusual. Infected PNG files are usually made by hand, not something that gets executed and goes infecting other PNG files.

You don't have to, but if you want to really be sure, open the file manager on Linux, right click on each image, Open With GIMP (or any other image editor on the distribution you are using), save the file in another format, like JPG. But I really don't think you will need to do this.

Now, your methods:

Plug in USB and copy the picture.

Some malware can copy themselves to any plugged USB drive, and create a copy of itself with the picture of a folder. Opening this "folder" infects the next computer. Other ones rely on bugs to infect the computer when a link is seen (not opened) on Windows Explorer. Improbable, but possible.

Go to Starbucks, connect to wifi and put the picture on cloud storage

You don't need to go to Starbucks, you can use your own network connection. And I don't think Google/Dropbox/Microsoft would scan a PNG file for you.

Look at the hex of the image...

What? That would mean typing an encyclopedia by hand... Better pay someone to paint the picture to you on canvas, by hand. It would be faster...

I would recommend downloading a live Linux distribution (Ubuntu is great for this), create a bootable USB device on a clean computer, and booting your infected computer with this USB drive.

With Linux running, you can copy all pictures to another USB drive, without any Windows malware interfering.

Virus attaching themselves to PNG files are very unusual. Infected PNG files are usually made by hand, not something that gets executed and goes infecting other PNG files.

You don't have to, but if you want to really be sure, open the file manager on Linux, right click on each image, Open With GIMP (or any other image editor on the distribution you are using), save the file in another format, like JPG. But I really don't think you will need to do this.

I would recommend downloading a live Linux distribution (Ubuntu is great for this), create a bootable USB device on a clean computer, and booting your infected computer with this USB drive.

With Linux running, you can copy all pictures to another USB drive, without any Windows malware interfering.

Virus attaching themselves to PNG files are very unusual. Infected PNG files are usually made by hand, not something that gets executed and goes infecting other PNG files.

You don't have to, but if you want to really be sure, open the file manager on Linux, right click on each image, Open With GIMP (or any other image editor on the distribution you are using), save the file in another format, like JPG. But I really don't think you will need to do this.

Now, your methods:

Plug in USB and copy the picture.

Some malware can copy themselves to any plugged USB drive, and create a copy of itself with the picture of a folder. Opening this "folder" infects the next computer. Other ones rely on bugs to infect the computer when a link is seen (not opened) on Windows Explorer. Improbable, but possible.

Go to Starbucks, connect to wifi and put the picture on cloud storage

You don't need to go to Starbucks, you can use your own network connection. And I don't think Google/Dropbox/Microsoft would scan a PNG file for you.

Look at the hex of the image...

What? That would mean typing an encyclopedia by hand... Better pay someone to paint the picture to you on canvas, by hand. It would be faster...

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source | link

I would recommend downloading a live Linux distribution (Ubuntu is great for this), create a bootable USB device on a clean computer, and booting your infected computer with this USB drive.

With Linux running, you can copy all pictures to another USB drive, without any Windows malware interfering.

Virus attaching themselves to PNG files are very unusual. Infected PNG files are usually made by hand, not something that gets executed and goes infecting other PNG files.

You don't have to, but if you want to really be sure, open the file manager on Linux, right click on each image, Open With GIMP (or any other image editor on the distribution you are using), save the file in another format, like JPG. But I really don't think you will need to do this.